girlhood

SORT BY:
Image features a rectangular sampler, in the upper half, a record of the births of members of the Sacket family: Stephen Sacket born May 23 1752. Eunice Lovering born Dec. 23 1748. Married Nov. 25 1776. Steph'n Sacket Jr. born Aug 7 1777. Eunice Sacket born April 25 1779. Hannah Sacket born Aug 7 1781. Sally Sacket born April 21 1786. Daniel Sact. born Sept 23 1790. Followed by a verse: "In prosperity friends are plenty In adversity not one in twenty." With scattered floral motifs and the initials SS in the lower half, and a floral border on three sides. The black background is embroidered on natural colored cloth. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Sacket Sampler
The unstructured nature of this family register sampler, initialed “SS” and attributed to Sally Sacket (b. 1786), is typical of eighteenth-century examples. In contrast to the more organized genealogy samplers that appear after 1800, the text here is run together in continuous lines. Sally’s sampler is one of a group of three Westfield, Massachusetts, examples...
Guilford Sampler
This sampler was worked by nine-year-old Elizabeth Starr Fowler (1822–1904) shortly after the death of her mother. It is unusual in that it combines elements of a traditional alphabet sampler with those of a mourning piece. At the top of the sampler are several rows of alphabets followed by a verse. The bottom section includes...
Six Years and Twenty-one Days
Elizabeth Ann Harpin Andrew was born on September 26, 1749, and stitched this sampler at the age of six. She ornamented her work with highly stylized floral motifs, framed with four-leaf clovers in a chain-link border. Elizabeth recorded the sampler’s completion date as October 17, 1755, and carefully calculated her age on that date as...
Concord Sampler
Hannah Cutter’s sampler is part of a large group of related examples worked from about 1790 until at least 1805 in Boston or nearby towns in Middlesex County. Typical characteristics of these samplers are deeply arcaded borders surrounding a central panel comprising an alphabet, verse, and pictorial elements framed by a saw-tooth border. The pictorial...
A Harrisburg Sampler
This sampler was worked in 1828 [or 1825] by Ann E. Kelly at the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, school of Leah Maguire. The central scene is either biblical or classical, and was undoubtedly inspired by a yet to be identified print source. It depicts a woman holding a long garland of flowers who appears to making a...
Picture of Sampler, 1810, Netherlands, embroidered
Symbols of Faith
Griet Ruwen’s sampler shows how deeply ingrained faith and religion were in daily Dutch culture in the early 19th century. Even as she practiced her needlework, Griet expressed piety and religious devotion through symbolism. Below the crowns and initials are two angels holding a wreath of roses, which represents eternity. The wreath encircles a dove,...
Connecticut Sampler
Sophia Smith’s sampler is part of a distinctive group of Wethersfield, Connecticut, samplers made at two different schools during the first quarter of the nineteenth century. Earlier examples were probably worked at the Abigail Goodrich School, which operated from around 1804 to 1815. Sophia’s is one of a later group of samplers, most likely made...
Rolling Hills and Trees
This sampler, made by Laura Bowker (1805-1843), is part of a small group of pictorial samplers worked by girls from Fitzwilliam, New Hampshire. Each of the charming works features a woman standing in a pastoral setting with trees, rolling hills, a pair of lambs, and an oversized basket of flowers. These bonneted ladies hold bouquets...
Nearly square sampler embroidered in soft shades of browns, blues, greens, and yellow on a natural linen ground. The field contains three alphabets, a set of numerals, a verse and inscription. At the bottom, a view delicately rendered in embroidery and watercolor of the Charlestown Neck House. On three sides, a deep border of rose garlands caught up with bows of blue ribbon at the upper corners.
Sampler by Lucy D. Stickney
Lucy Drury Stickney was the daughter of William Stickney (1783-1868) and Margaret Nowell (1792-1840). Born in 1818, she was named for her father’s first wife, Lucy Drury (1787-1812), with whom he had had two sons. Margaret bore him six daughters and two sons, one of whom died in infancy. William Stickney began his career as...