Object of the Day

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Image features: Black cotton taffeta with a single vertical column of white embroidery down the center. The 37 three-dimensional embroidered motifs include butterflies, birds, flowers, and the word PEACE. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Forest Parade
Akira Minagawa opened his first minä perhonen fashion boutique in Tokyo’s Shirokanedai district in 2000, and began showing his collections in Paris in 2004. Forest Parade, introduced as part of the Spring/Summer 2005 collection, has become an iconic design for the brand. “Perhonen” means butterfly in Finnish, and this design includes butterflies, birds, flowers, branches,...
Image features poster showing close up rendering of colorful layers of diced and sliced vegetables. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
A Nice Day for a Picnic
Today’s blog post was originally published on June 18, 2013. In 1970, Steven Frykholm was working as the in-house graphic designer for the furniture manufacturer Herman Miller, Inc., when a company vice-president stopped by his desk.  Every summer, the VP said, Herman Miller hosted a company picnic.  Perhaps Frykholm would make up a poster for the...
The image features a mural miniature by Joan Miro called "El Sol" or the Sun. Please scroll down for a further discussion of this wallpaper mural.
A Miró of Your Very own
A version of this post was originally published on June 4, 2017.   This is a repost from an earlier year, but it seemed appropriate for the warm summer weather currently being experienced across the United States. It is called El Sol, or the Sun, and it is printed in primarily cool colors which seems...
Image features: Child's sleeping mat composed of several layers of indigo dyed cotton fabrics, patched and heavily stitched. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Pieced and Patched
Today, indigo-dyed cotton cloth and clothing are emblematic of Japanese folk traditions. But cotton is not indigenous to Japan, and for most of Japan’s history, rural clothing was made from available plant fibers: paper mulberry, ramie, nettle, hemp, and wisteria. Cotton, which was originally introduced through Korea and China, was first cultivated in the warmer,...
Image features a drawing of a nautilus-shaped house situated in a fantastic landscape of rocky cliffs. Please scroll down to to read the blog post about this object.
A Dream Come True
Emilio Terry once described his creative work as “a dream come true,” an attitude reflected in his 1933 pen and ink sketch, Fantasy.[1] Although perhaps less familiar to modern audiences, Terry was one of the best-known designers of his time. Born to a wealthy family in Havana, Cuba, he later moved to France, where he lived and worked...
Image shows a wallpaper border that is embossed and die-cut paper with an image of grapes hanging from a trellis. Please scroll down for further information on this border paper.
Die-cut to Perfection: New Trend in Borders
Presenting an unusual wallpaper border that reflects both the current wall fashion and the use of new technology. This paper border is embossed and die-cut, with many open or pierced areas within the design. The border consists of large bunches of purple grapes hanging on the vine with green-colored foliage. The vine is suspended from...
Image features patchwork medallion with a star pattern in unbleached cotton and three roller-printed cottons in browns, tans and pinks. Handwritten in dark brown ink in the center circle: "Olivia C. Whitridge, New Bedford, 1853." Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
A Lasting Remnant of a Friendship
Olivia Cushing Whitridge (1783-1876) was born to a prominent New England family with ties to Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Maine. She married William Whitridge, and the couple lived in New Bedford, Massachusetts. It was in New Bedford, a whaling town, that Olivia C. Whitridge created this “Mariner’s Compass” patchwork medallion. The Mariner’s Compass pattern “was...
Image features a poster depicting a series of mixers and sliders that categorize the albums of David Bowie between a set of extremes. Featuring seven columns for each album released between 1976-84, with "DAVID/ BOWIE" printed in silver ink in custom typography. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Less Ziggy, More Stardust
Today’s blog post was originally published on July 10, 2013. There are many ways to celebrate an anniversary.  To commemorate a decade of working together as the design duo Non-Format, Kjell Ekhorn and Jon Forss did not opt for the traditional gifting of tin, pewter, or aluminum.  Instead, they pooled their creative energies towards a personal...
Image features: Drapery sheer with vertical satin stripes, with an all-over irregular crinkle pleating. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Gin Fizz
Relying on innovative technologies to produce unusual surface textures, Jack Lenor Larsen (American, b. 1927) created Gin Fizz using a heat set process, which ultimately transforms a two-dimensional plane into a three-dimensional pleated surface. In his travels to Japan, Larsen met and befriended one of the most important twentieth century textile designers, Junichi Arai (Japanese,...