Author: Gregory Herringshaw

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Image shows a high magnification of vertical cords printed in monochrome pink. Please scroll down for more detailed information on this wallcovering.
Strike a Cord with your Walls
In celebration of our new exhibition, The Senses: Design Beyond Vision, this Object of the Day post explores the multisensory experience of an object in Cooper Hewitt’s permanent collection. Today’s blog post was written by Greg Herringshaw and originally published on October 22, 2015. Cord #1 is a greatly magnified image of vertical cords or yarn which...
Image features the Knoll Wall Collection sample book with the Niji wallcovering designed by Jhane Barnes showing through the clear plastic cover. This woven textile contains a great variety of muted colors woven together. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Wall Fashions by Jhane Barnes
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. Jhane Barnes is best known for her beautifully colored and structured fabrics, and I have always been a fan of her men’s fashion, but she designed furniture and wallcoverings as well. She established her fashion company in...
Image shows a bandbox bottom, with lid removed, covered in wallpaper with printed scene of a woman driving a chariot pulled by a single horse. Scene is enframed in a foliate scroll medallion. Please scroll down for a further description of this image.
Building a Better Box
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. Blogging today about an early women designer and craftsperson, Hannah Davis. Hannah is known for creating some of the most finely constructed bandboxes in the business. She entered the field in 1818 at the age of 34....
Image shows a block-printed wallpaper with a medallion stripe pattern printed in a monochrome blue-gray colorway, with each medallion surrounded by two dogs and two birds. Please scroll down to read the blog post for this object.
Merging Craft and the Modern
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. This sidewall, with its medallions and stylized animal imagery, brings to mind medieval and Renaissance brocades made centuries earlier. However, its two-tone blue gray color scheme has little in common with the vibrant colors of those rich...
Murals Go Mod
Labyrinth is from a collection of murals ranging from traditional ruins and landscapes to more modern styles, or should I say mod? I love all the different wall surfaces, each decorated with a different pattern, and the circular cutouts that really open up the design. This page from the book is a miniature of the...
Through the Archway
This paper has a decidedly modern look with the minimalist landscape seen through the arch. The view is bordering on surreal, centering on the ruins of a colonnade, with strong horizontal shadows going off to the right. Two trees are seen in the distance, with a flock of gulls or pigeons, which I initially thought...
The Hounds of Bennington
I was scrolling through some images and came across this bandbox fragment. This appears to be about half of the side panel of a box which has been flattened and probably framed at some point. This is a specially printed bandbox paper illustrating a battle or conflict of some sort, though I’m having trouble identifying...
To Cowslip Farm
I have long admired the wide children’s borders, also called friezes, designed and produced in the early twentieth century, prior to the Great Depression in 1929. Cooper Hewitt has a fair collection of these with the most popular being Winnie the Pooh, produced ca. 1926, coinciding with the release of the book by A.A. Milne...
Please Do Feed the Squirrels
If you’ve been reading Object of the Day blogs you have probably read past articles on bandboxes. Popular in the United States from around 1800-1850, these were made of pasteboard and covered with either a wallpaper or a specially printed bandbox paper. The original intent was to store and transport men’s collar bands, but soon...