Object of the Day

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1937-3-1
Butcher-in-a-Box
How can you draw customers inside your shop, when exposing wares in a window is not an option? This framed wooden butcher’s shop might be an answer.  Although it is unclear to what uses this framed life-like model of a butcher’s shop might have been put, the fact that it is framed and behind glass,...
In a doorway flanked by columns stands a man in heavy dress. Above doorway, a bust in relief. Notations visible in ink.
Mysterious Stranger
Does the artist behind this drawing simply intend to represent a doorway, or rather use this as an elaborate pretext in creating a portrait of a mysterious figure? Such a question will undoubtedly remain unanswered. Through a seemingly simple combination of architectural elements surrounding a male figure, Barberi conveys something distinctly atmospheric. With cloak thrown...
44400_f3c1ba8ccc49d2a4_b[1]
Innovative Printers in Brooklyn
Murals became a fashionable wall decoration in the mid-twentieth century. Murals differ slightly from scenic wallpapers in that most were designed to cover a single wall, or to separate or highlight a section of a larger wall, where scenic wallpapers were designed to run continuously around a room. Many mural designs could also be continuous...
Nearly square sampler embroidered in soft shades of browns, blues, greens, and yellow on a natural linen ground. The field contains three alphabets, a set of numerals, a verse and inscription. At the bottom, a view delicately rendered in embroidery and watercolor of the Charlestown Neck House. On three sides, a deep border of rose garlands caught up with bows of blue ribbon at the upper corners.
Sampler by Lucy D. Stickney
Lucy Drury Stickney was the daughter of William Stickney (1783-1868) and Margaret Nowell (1792-1840). Born in 1818, she was named for her father’s first wife, Lucy Drury (1787-1812), with whom he had had two sons. Margaret bore him six daughters and two sons, one of whom died in infancy. William Stickney began his career as...
2008-35-1
Weaving with light
Designer Suzanne Tick has shown that design can be functional, sustainable, innovative, and aesthetically pleasing. For example, in a recent video made on the occasion of Earth Day, Tick wove interesting colorful textiles using foil balloons recovered from the beach, as well as wire hangers discarded by the dry cleaners. In creating this hanging lamp,...
Threepenny Opera - Paul Davis
One Penny, Two Penny, Threepenny, Four!
The reigning composition of theater posters in the 1970s consisted of credit lines for the cast, producers, directors, etc. Because of this, Paul Davis’ relatively simple presentation, though standard for Davis’ early posters, was completely innovative. Paul Davis approached these posters in a way which relayed nearly no information about the play beyond its title...
1950-111-10
Blossoms and Birds
The exuberance of pre-WWI style is captured with great panache in this French sidewall c. 1905 – 1913. Cherry blossoms, hanging orchids and host of other gigantic pink flowers burst out from a gnarled moss-laden branch, which snakes its way up the panel. An in-your-face cockatoo, rendered in riotous rainbow colors sits front and center,...
Sutnar
Modernism in a Milk Jug
Functionalism is the idea that form should follow function; objects should be designed simply, honestly, and directly. [1] It should be immediately clear to a viewer and a user what the object is and how to use it. Functionalist objects are primarily domestic objects, which makes this milk jug an example of Functionalism in inter-war...
Esquisse Decoratives _Clef (Key) Pl.14
Art Nouveau and Everyday Life
Art nouveau as both an architectural style and a style for any kind of ornament, permeated so much of European culture during the time period of 1890–1910. Fashion, graphic design, household furnishings and so many other everyday objects reflected this style – even your house keys were Art Nouveau! The Cooper-Hewitt Library has a large...