silk

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Bag of silk, printed on both sides, commemorating the landing of General Lafayette at Castle Gardens N.Y. in 1824.
A Mixed Bag of Historical Accuracy
Author: Virginia Pollock While this hand painted silk bag may seem like a simple fashion accessory, in reality it marks one of the most celebrated events in 1824 in the city of New York. On the backside of the purse there is an inscription that reads: “Landing of General Lafayette / at the Castle Garden...
Image features book cover of Silk Dyeing, printing and finishing by George H Hurst. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Technological Handbooks
The museum as “practical working laboratory” that sisters Sarah and Eleanor Hewitt envisioned for the study of the decorative arts, could not have been realized without the extensive collection of books and supporting materials found in the library at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Numerous books about process, such as the...
Lucky Pines
This Japanese fabric was produced for a maru obi, the most formal of obi for women. Maru obi cloth is typically woven in widths of twenty-five to twenty-six inches—about double the width of more casual styles of obi. The cloth is folded around a stiff lining and stitched together along the selvedges. It is bulky,...
Striking in Stripes
Author: Elena Phipps September is New York Textile Month! In celebration, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles...
Cloth of Memory
Author: Pat Hickman September is New York Textile Month! In celebration, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles...
The Master Silk Printer
Elizabeth Broman discusses the 1920s trade catalogue The Master Silk Printer.
Airy Weave
Airy Weave is an excellent example of technologically innovative contemporary Japanese textiles. It is a triple layer silk fabric woven on a jacquard loom with a middle layer that has no warp, which allows the weft threads to float independently of the two outer layers. The resulting structure highlights the textile’s dimensionality and movement, as...
Green Glossary: K for Kibiso
Kibiso is a Japanese word referring to a type of silk waste.
Window Shade for the Well Dressed Parlor
I recently had the pleasure of photographing two rather large window shades that had never really been viewed before, due to their large size and fragile nature. These are part of a group of four shades, with each being contained in a rather simple but elegant wood cornice. The two shades that were photographed had...