lgbtqia+

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Open spread of an illustrated book. On the left is a full-page black-and-white image of two elongated figures looking at a third figure that resembles a full moon. On the right is the book's title page. Two figures are embedded in intricate foliage. A rectangle with a blank background contains the title: "Salome: A Tragedy in one Act : Translated from the French of Oscar Wilde : Pictured by Aubrey Beardsley"
There’s Something About Salome
When Salome requests a severed head on a platter, be careful what you wish for. Or write. Or draw. In 1894, Oscar Wilde and Aubrey Beardsley—both considered enfants terribles of Victorian England for their provocative work and lifestyles—produced a printed edition of Wilde’s play Salome. Wilde’s psychological centralization on the character of Salome and Beardsley’s...
Cooper Hewitt presents Planet Bushwig Warmup. On a black background speckled with white line drawings of astronomical bodies, huge bold rainbow gradient text declares Planet Bushwig Warmup. The text hovers above a line drawing of handsome Carnegie Mansion with a rainbow flag draped over its entrance.
Cooper Hewitt Presents: Planet Bushwig Warmup
In celebration of Pride Month, Cooper Hewitt presents: Planet Bushwig Warmup! The House of Bushwig returns to Cooper Hewitt virtually for an electrifying performance hosted by House mother Horrorchata, co-founder of the celebrated annual Brooklyn drag festival Bushwig. Enjoy performances by Merrie Cherry, Neon Calypso, Mocha Lite, Miz Jade, Kandy Muse, Zavaleta, Uncle Freak, Horrorchata...
A photograph of a large brick and stone building that is set against a blue sky and a field of green grass stretched before it. Hung from the middle of the building is a rectangular rainbow flag, composed of six stripes of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple. People congregate in small groups on the grass.
The Rainbow Flag @ Cooper Hewitt
The LGBTQIA+ Pride flag, often referred to as the rainbow flag, symbolizes the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community. The design was originally conceived in 1978 by artist and activist Gilbert Baker (American, 1951–2017) and fabricated with Baker’s friends and fellow artists at the Gay Community Center in San Francisco, California. Directly inspired by...