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A Bold Statement
Australian graphic designer Mark Gowing designed this poster to advertise the film Tyson, a documentary about the controversial and legendary boxer Mike Tyson. The critically-acclaimed film was directed by James Toback, and closely follows Tyson’s career and personal life through lengthy interviews and archival footage. For his poster design, Gowing adapted elements from the graphic...
On beige background, in black, a human skull appears to be flying toward the viewer with outspread eagle wings. Behind him follows an innumerable "flock" of text--a repetition of the word "ptaki" (birds) in varying fonts of varying sizes. At the top, left of center, the inscription "niesamowity film / ALFREDA HITCOCKA / wykonawcy: Rod Taylor / "Tippi" Hedren Jessica Tandy / Suzanne Pieshette / produkcja: Hitchcock-Universal".
Fear and Flight
Constraints are often said to offer the best conditions for creativity. During the communist era, Polish graphics flourished. Due to the lack of external influences, poster designers needed to create their own isolated yet diverse visual language.[1] Cut off from Western iconography, these creatives were tasked with advertising the few American films that penetrated the...
Monster Hands
Andrzej Pagowski is a leading member of the third generation of the Polish School of Poster Art. By actively interpreting a subject with emotionally charged images, often drawn or painted by hand, these designers tell stories through the medium of the poster. Pagowksi created this poster for the Polish distribution of Roman Polanski’s legendary 1968...
Battleship!
It is fascinating to compare the visual concept behind Hans Hillmann’s poster Panzerkreuzer Potemkin (Battleship Potemkin) for the 1966 German rerelease of Sergei Eisenstein’s 1925 film with that of Stanislaw Zamecznik’s for the same film dating a year later in Poland. It is hard to imagine a more minimalist design than Hans Hillmann’s striking composition....
Masked Cowboy
While many film and theater posters entice viewers with direct eye contact and a strong emotional connection, others build tension by denying that basic human satisfaction. The giant brimmed hat featured in Waldemar Swierzy’s 1973 film poster for Midnight Cowboy  hides the character’s eyes. The portrait focuses our attention on the man’s full, ripe lips while...