women artists

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Sweet Peas
Mrs. Henrietta Maria Benson Homer exhibited Sweet Peas at the Brooklyn Art Association in April 1876, asking the relatively modest sum of $20 for the work.[1] In the same show, her son—Winslow Homer—also exhibited work.  Henrietta had taught her son the basics of drawing and painting, and helped to spark his interest in watercolor.  After...
Image features brooch of inverted ovoid form composed of various media and costume jewelry fragments: colorful cast metal fringe-like surround, small red figure of Venus, plastic globes suggesting oranges, colored beads and glass pastes, central metal fleur-de-lys, plastic white pineapples, and glass leaves. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Fruit-topped Hats and Mixed Media Jewelry
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. The Venus brooch by Judy Onofrio radiates with a splash of color and a sense of humor. Reminiscent of fruit-topped headdresses seen in old movie musicals, the form is decorated with tiny found fragments–plastic beads suggesting oranges,...
Image features a young woman in a period gown descending a grand, curving staircase. Her left hand is resting on the bannister, and her right hand holds a cloak, dragging on the stairs. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Descending A Staircase
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. In a prolific career spanning six decades, Elizabeth Shippen Green (1871—1954) illustrated more than two dozen books and produced hundreds of illustrations for newspapers and magazines.  From 1901 until 1924, she worked under exclusive contract to Harper’s...
Image features turquoise colored book enclosure with straight sides and arched top; the title, "Corona De Rosas" above "Maria de Los Angeles" and "Purgatory Pie Press", all printed in black ink. Enclosure bound with a red ribbon. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Corona de Rosas
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. A recent acquisition in our library collection is the beautifully rendered artist book, Corona de Rosas (Crown of Roses), with illustrations of women in beautiful colorful flowered dresses. A collaborative work by artist Maria de los Angeles, and Esther...
Image features drawing showing three grotesque profiles of men in long wigs, outlined with scratching, exploratory lines imitating roughly drawn grotesques by William Hogarth. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Jane Ireland: Faithful Copies and a Famous Hoax in 18th-century London
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. Jane Ireland and her sister Anna Maria were artists and print-makers in 18th-century London. Like many early women artists in Europe—to whom formal training was rarely available—the Ireland sisters learned their craft from their father. Samuel Ireland...
Image features an unpublished title page design for the book, Occupations of Women and Their Compensation. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
A Priestess of Book Design
The career of Alice Cordelia Morse reflects the changing role of women in art and society in the late 19th century. Morse was able to achieve success in many artistic fields, designing book covers, illustrations, and stained glass, while also experimenting with other decorative media such as china painting and needlework. Although this title-page design was...
Pen and brown ink drawing of a woman seated on an octagonal platform, painting at an easel. She is encircled by eight columns supporting a cupola above.
Elisabetta Sirani, “Gem of Italy”
On November 14, 1665, the Basilica of San Domenico in Bologna was crowded with mourners. They were gathered to remember a young female artist, Elisabetta Sirani (1638 – 1665), who had died suddenly the previous August.[1] Although only 27 at the time of her death, Elisabetta was already an acclaimed painter, draftsman, and printmaker—a contemporary...