China

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Image features a square teapot in pink with white and gilt angled bamboo edges. Triangular spout at corner opposite handle. Decorated with landscape view on one side. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
A Victorian Teapot in Millenial Pink
Author: Zenia Malmer To the modern eye, this 19th century teapot, made by Edwin James Drew Bodley, who was in charge of an English china and earthenware manufacturer in Staffordshire, might border on kitsch. The spout, handle and edges are decorated with moulded bamboo stalks, with gilding to accentuate their nodes. Bright pink panels feature...
Image features an ornament in the form of a butterfly alighting on a blossom, depicted in bright blue kingfisher feathers, brown resin, and red and green foil-covered beads mounted on a sheet silver backing. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Symphony of Shimmering Iridescence
Author: Morgan Albahary Made in China around 1900, this small yet striking ornament depicts a delicate butterfly alighting on the plush petals of a blossoming flower. With its profusion of iridescent kingfisher feathers, which have been deftly cut and inlaid into delineated segments of silver sheet, the ornament’s materiality firmly grounds it within the tradition...
Baby carrier of deep indigo-dyed cotton, embroidered with three rectangles of complex lozenge patterns in white, with borders of pink, white, and blue embroidery. In the lower left and right corners, starburst designs embroidered in white.
The Ties That Bind
Author: Joanne Schmidt In celebration of the third annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination...
Image features circular gilt bronze clock mounted on head of seated figure of Pu Tai Ho-Shang (Chinese god of contentment) in white porcelain, the whole on a scrolling Rococo style footed base. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
A Search for Contentment in France
This clock does not merely depict a portly man enjoying a good laugh. The soft-paste porcelain figure portrays Pu-Tai Ho Shang, a Chinese folklore deity. “Pu-Tai” means cloth sack, and the figure is usually shown with one; here, the sack supports the seated figure’s left arm. The jolly but poor deity uses the small sack...
Image features a low, deep red circular box deeply carved with a landscape on the lid, surrounded by bands and fields of geometric and floral decoration and Buddhist symbols. Box sits on a carved circular wooden stand. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Detailed Carvings are Wishes for a Long Life Filled with Abundance
To celebrate the opening of Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color (May 11, 2018-January 13, 2019), Object of the Day this month will feature colorful objects from the exhibition. This red lacquer box has a short circular foot and a precisely fitted circular lid. Together these elements combine to present a unified whole. The box rests...
Behind the History of Chinese Ornament
Examples of Chinese Ornament Selected from Objects in the South Kensington Museum and Other Collections (figure 1) was written by Owen Jones (1809-1874), one of the most influential English architects, designers, and design theorists of the nineteenth century. Jones selected 100 full-color plates sourced from the motifs of Chinese ceramics, cloisonné works, and carpet designs,...
Fashion Fusion
The Qing imperial rulers (1644-1911) were of Manchu ethnicity, and ruled over a mostly Han population. For centuries, Manchu women were required to wear long one-piece robes and Han women two-piece outfits that included a jacket and skirt. Featuring elements of both traditions, this Manchu jacket demonstrates the increasing fusion of these fashions in the...
A Tale of Fish and Dragons
After nearly sixty years of inactivity, the kilns at Jingdezhen were restored by the Kangxi emperor around 1680. Considered to be one of the greatest Chinese emperors for the progress in the natural sciences and the arts China made under his rule, the Kangxi emperor reigned from 1662 to 1722. During this time, the Jingdezhen...
Silver-plated bulbous body tapering into elongated spout on one side; opposite spout, long handle composed of two curved, deep purple anodized aluminum elements overlapping and extending outward, joined by two green onyx beads at point of contact with each other. Circular lid with small square knop topped with curved, deep purple anodized aluminum tab handle.
Going with the Flow
This teapot demonstrates a unique way of creating organic and curved lines, which can be seen in the handle. Chunghi Choo’s calligraphy brush strokes served as the inspiration for the handle and knob. According to Choo, the “sweeping movements of the brush…give it a flowing line of energy.”[1] Chunghi Choo studied painting, including Chinese brush...