Carnegie mansion

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Composite image of two photographs. The left, a portrait of Peter Cooper. He is an older man with small glasses and a bushy white beard. He is pictured from the chest up, facing forward, and looking directly into the camera. On the right is a portrait of Andrew Carnegie. Also an older man, Carnegie has white hair and a white, groomed beard and mustache. He wears a three-piece black suit and a bow tie. He is pictured from the chest up, turned in three-quarter view, looking at the viewer.
Cooper Hewitt Short Stories: The Hewitts & The Carnegies
In last month’s Short Story, Jodi Rodgers discussed the drawings of Robert Frederick Blum and the purveyance of American drawing through the Cooper Union Museum’s collection. This month, we address the “Who is Cooper?” and “Who is Hewitt?” and “Why Carnegie?” questions that often accompany introductions of Cooper Hewitt’s name and location. We investigate and...
Set in Style: Gallery Tour with Patrick Jouin
Join Patrick Jouin, installation designer for Set In Style: The Jewelry of Van Cleef & Arpels, for a tour of this stunning exhibition from a behind the scenes perspective.
Cooper-Hewitt’s RE:DESIGN
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Come Home to Cocktails@Cooper-Hewitt
  When the Carnegie mansion was built, it may have been lavish, but it was designed to be home. That spirit lives on in Cocktails@Cooper-Hewitt, our popular summer series. Every Friday evening, Members and museum visitors come “home” to Cooper-Hewitt to unwind for the weekend.     The Ed Fuqua Group provides smooth sounds of...
Quicktake: Rodarte – Behind the Scenes Part 2
Before any mannequin dressing begins, proper museum protocol regarding the intake of objects must be followed. The process generally goes like this: First, the boxes or crates are opened in a clean and secure gallery or room that has environmental controls (including a specific relative humidity and temperature). The entire uncrating process is always photographed,...
“It was time for a change, Louise…”
Ingo Maurer and his extraordinary team of designers and technicians have managed to dramatically transform the second floor of the Carnegie Mansion into a fiesta of lights and objects. But Maurer uses a sensitive touch while maintaining the original character of this grand domestic space. If anything, he has made it even more intimate and...