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Flowing Form Blends the Man-Made with the Organic
The Enignum Free Form Chair by Joseph Walsh curves, swirls and ripples in a manner that is reminiscent of furniture from the Art Nouveau period, yet it is contemporary in its overall aesthetic. Joseph Walsh, a self-taught designer and builder, started working with wood at the age of eight, and honed both his woodworking skill...
Modern War Effort
The husband and wife design duo, Charles and Ray Eames, are most often associated with their beautifully contoured chairs that became a visual hallmark of postwar California culture. Charles Eames, who had worked with architect Eero Saarinen at Cranbrook Academy in Michigan in the late 1930s, began experimenting with molded plywood, which would become a...
Armchair composed of strips of light-colored maple curved and glued to form back, arms, legs and seat; strips within circular seat woven to form flat surface.
Stickhandling
The Cross Check Chair is named after a hockey infraction in which a player holds their stick vertically and blocks another player, illegally checking them. The name is also a reference to the seat of this chair, which is made out of interwoven maple plywood strips, creating a check pattern, and a double meaning of...
Undulating single panel seat starting from a back-curved head rest and descending on an angled plane to the bottom of spine before heading up to bend at the knee area and descending slightly at calf length, all supported between two curvilinear arms, descending to a cross bar and continuing to form back legs, connecting at the cross brace to seat supports of trapezoidal shape.
Bending for the Brits
The Hungarian-born Marcel Breuer is perhaps best known for his tubular steel B3 (‘Wassily’) and B32 (‘Cesca’) chairs, which he designed while leading the carpentry workshop at the Bauhaus, after it moved from Weimar to Dessau, Germany, in 1925.  Legend has it his experiments with tubular steel were inspired by his bicycle. Breuer, who was...
Design [R]evolutions: Modern Times
Cheryl Buckley, Professor of Design History, Northumbria University, Newcastle From the curving lines of Thonet bentwood furniture and delicate Lalique glass to sumptuous jacquard woven textiles and Japanese-influenced graphics, the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries produced extraordinarily beautiful objects. Professor Cheryl Buckley and a panel of experts will tell the story of the turn...