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Image features front Cover of Morris wall-papers by Morris & Company. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object
William Morris Wall-Papers
I could wax poetic on the virtues and talents of William Morris (1834-1896), such as his renowned association with the British Arts and Crafts movement, his contribution to the revival of textiles, the way he established concepts of modern fantasy, and his socialist endeavors. Instead, let’s view this rare trade catalog published by the Morris & Company...
Image features a low, deep red circular box deeply carved with a landscape on the lid, surrounded by bands and fields of geometric and floral decoration and Buddhist symbols. Box sits on a carved circular wooden stand. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Detailed Carvings are Wishes for a Long Life Filled with Abundance
To celebrate the opening of Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color (May 11, 2018-January 13, 2019), Object of the Day this month will feature colorful objects from the exhibition. This red lacquer box has a short circular foot and a precisely fitted circular lid. Together these elements combine to present a unified whole. The box rests...
Textile, "Gold Ripple-Wave Fabric", ca. 1956
A Fabric with a Touch of Tomorrow
To celebrate the opening of Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color, Object of the Day this month will feature colorful objects from the exhibition. This post was originally published September 4, 2012. America, 1957. Eisenhower was the President. Elvis was “the King.” And Ford Motor Company introduced its new 1957 automobiles, a “new kind...
A Complete Interior
This Object of the Day  celebrates one of many treasured objects given by Clare and Eugene V. Thaw to Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.  It is published here in memory of Eugene V. Thaw. Click on this link to read more about the Thaws and their gifts to Cooper Hewitt.  The popularity of boldly-decorated faience must be...
New Expressions of Antiquity
Ceramic beads have been used in jewelry for millennia. Recognizing the utilitarian quality of this material, Peter Hoogeboom chooses it as the primary material for his neckpieces. Hoogeboom had noted historical ceramic jewelry in museums yet did not often see clay used in contemporary jewelry. Through experimentation he found that the slip casting technique allowed him...
Interlacings
Ethel Stein (American, b. 1917) is a Westchester-based artist weaver. Trained as a woodworker, painter and sculptor, Stein became interested in textiles in the 1970s. She began her investigation of the techniques of weaving by studying historic textiles in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Cooper Hewitt. Working closely with former curator...
Viennese Swag
Modern Viennese design greatly influenced American style during the Jazz Age. This vase, currently on view in the The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s, chronicles this dialogue in the history of modern design. Remarkably, it was one of a pair originally offered in the short-lived Wiener Werkstätte showroom in New York City. Established in 1921...
Playful Exuberance: Dagobert Peche’s Silver Vase
Now on view in The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s, this vase by Dagobert Peche is an explosion of movement and life.
Dining Under the Stars
Now on view in The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s, Joseph Urban's design for a roof garden reflects turn-of-the-century summer dining at its finest.