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Image features wall mirror with simple rectangular frame with incised line and thumb indention-type decoration; uprights concave at top; top decorated with swags and stylized flowers. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object
Brandt in Bloom
This post was originally published on December 12, 2015. The French designer Edgar Brandt spurred a revival of interest in interior furnishings made of iron in the 1920s. His participation in the 1925 Paris Exposition won him great praise. Brandt’s ironwork was admired throughout the fair; he designed the gates of the front entrance, his...
Cast bronze side chair composed of flat disk seat on four straight cylindrical legs; back composed of cast bronze painter’s palette decorated with spirals; "crest rail" consisting of a horizontal rod, a headless figure below the rod, to left of palette, and six different sized heads sitting on the rod; three cast bronze heads situated between the seat and back, supporting the back, with a fourth head to the right. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
The Artist’s Chair
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. The Oka chair, by Michele Oka Doner, is both a utilitarian furnishing and a highly detailed sculptural piece. The chair’s seat is a flat textured disk which rests on straight, unadorned legs. The back, where all the...
A Tiffany & Co. Masterwork in Mokumé
Tiffany & Co. exhibited an extraordinary mixed metal vase at the Paris 1889 Universal Exposition. Created from a layered block of 24-karat gold, silver, and copper, it was 32 inches high, priced at $5000, and the largest known object ever made using the Japanese technique of mokumé. “The most remarkable triumph of Tiffany & Co....
Image of drawings by IIonka Karasz.
Tabletop Geometry
Gail Davidson discusses modernist designer Ilonka Karasz's geometric iterations for tableware.
“All Kirked Up: Tiffany and Co. Pitcher”
During the second half of the nineteenth century, there was a burgeoning interest in the designs of the Middle East, Japan, and China. This passion for all things that were “exotic” in the eyes of Americans led to a craze for objects inspired by these international decorative arts. At the time, much of the silver...
Details in a Doppelpokal
In 16th century Germany, the popularity of Doppelpokal, better known as double goblets or cups, and the taste for elegant, classicized forms are reflected in this small print by Hieronymus Hopfer (German, active ca. 1520-1530). As the ancestors of wine glasses, double cups, which fit over each other at the rim, were intended for ceremonial...
Lella Vignelli: A Look at a Design Legend
Versatile designer Lella Vignelli, who died on December 22nd, played a vital role in firmly establishing the clean lines and clarity of Modernism in twentieth century American design. Her designs were pertinent throughout the late twentieth century and remain so today. Vignelli was born into a family of architects in Udine, Italy in 1934. She...
Acanthus in Motion
A lion and a hare are composed entirely of scrolling acanthus leaves in this late-seventeenth-century engraving. It is the fifth plate from a suite of six designs for gold ornament, entitled Neu-ersonnene Gold-Schmieds Grillen (New Designs for Ornaments in Gold). The acanthus motif, whose origins date to ancient Greece and Rome, was omnipresent in European...
Tiffany & Co. at the Chicago Fair
Founded in 1837, Tiffany & Co. by the late 19th century had become one of the leading manufacturers and retailers in America of fine jewelry and luxury items.  This small catalog lists items on display from Tiffany & Co.  in the Manufacturers and Liberal Arts Building at the Chicago’s World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893.  The...