Bauhaus

SORT BY:
Image features a rectangular sheet with a variety of geometric patterns—rectangles, squares, triangles, and chevrons—in a muted palette of sandy pink, dusty beige, taupe, grey, and brown with isolated dots and small squares in white gouache and red wash. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
Reorientation and Replication
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. Adelgunde “Gunta” Stölzl was one of the most successful women designers connected with the Bauhaus, the school founded in 1919 by the German architect Walter Gropius. The mission of the Bauhaus was to integrate art, design, and craft...
Image features a book plate showing a color chart in the form of a 12-pointed star set above a rectangular chart composed of horizontal colored bars. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
A Not So Modern Color Tool
To celebrate the opening of Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color (May 11, 2018-January 13, 2019), Object of the Day this month will feature colorful objects from the exhibition. Professor Johannes Itten created a color sphere, represented by this 12-pointed star, as a tool for students at the Bauhaus. Inspired by Philipp Otto Runge’s...
This image features an Axonometric view of living room/bedroom with studio bed and built-in cabinet in upper corner; a square table with retractable shelves and two arm chairs on either side of table; horizontal strip lighting hangs high on wall above cabinet and bed; and glass shelves for plants hang right of the bed; black and white rectangular carpet/linoleum beneath table and chairs. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.
A Room of One’s Own
In celebration of Women’s History Month, March Object of the Day posts highlight women designers in the collection. Today’s blog post was written by Caitlin Condell and originally published September 30, 2015. German-born Margarethe (Grete) Fröhlich was a young artist when she moved to Frankfurt, Germany in 1929.  In the early 1920s Frankfurt had experienced a...
The New Bauhaus
This rare catalog details the curriculum, philosophy, faculty, and objectives of the School of Design in Chicago in the early 1940s. It is essentially a promotional guide geared to perspective students. The New Bauhaus, as the institution was called, was created as an industrial design school by Hungarian born Bauhaus masters László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) and...
This is a Teapot and lid. It was designed by Marek Cecula. It is dated 1991. Its medium is glazed porcelain.
Memories of Bauhaus
One would not have thought that “fragment” and “porcelain” could co-exist as happily as they do in this teapot, from Marek Cecula’s “Fragment Series”.  Why fragment? Cecula (born Poland, 1944, working in New York) writes that, in creating the “Fragment Series”, he wanted to “substitute conventional functionality into a utilitarian sculpture.” In this sense, the...
This is a Vase. It was designed by Margarete H. L. Marks and manufactured by Haël-Werkstätten. It is dated ca. 1930. Its medium is glazed earthenware.
A Stroke Of Color
Margarete Heymann-Loebenstein-Marks, also known as Grete Marks, was a German ceramicist and painter who studied at the Bauhaus School of Arts in Weimer in 1920–21, alongside Paul Klee and Georg Muche. Prior to this, she had attended the Kunstgewerbeschule in Cologne and studied painting at the Akademie der bildenden Künste in Düsseldorf. Her time at...
A Room of One’s Own
German-born Margarethe (Grete) Fröhlich was a young artist when she moved to Frankfurt, Germany in 1929.  In the early 1920s Frankfurt had experienced a housing crisis.  In an effort to address the shortage of affordable housing, the city embarked on a major building project, constructing nearly 15,000 residences in a period of five years.  The...
Undulating single panel seat starting from a back-curved head rest and descending on an angled plane to the bottom of spine before heading up to bend at the knee area and descending slightly at calf length, all supported between two curvilinear arms, descending to a cross bar and continuing to form back legs, connecting at the cross brace to seat supports of trapezoidal shape.
Bending for the Brits
The Hungarian-born Marcel Breuer is perhaps best known for his tubular steel B3 (‘Wassily’) and B32 (‘Cesca’) chairs, which he designed while leading the carpentry workshop at the Bauhaus, after it moved from Weimar to Dessau, Germany, in 1925.  Legend has it his experiments with tubular steel were inspired by his bicycle. Breuer, who was...
A mixture of different type fonts arranged on a diagonal opposition with rectilinear text blocks. Printed in "split-fountain" which produces color transitions from red at top left, through orange, yellow to green, blue, lavender and violet at bottom right corner.
Tanzstudio
In 1931 when he designed this poster, the Swiss artist, designer, and architect Max Bill had already completed several years of study at the Bauhaus under the guidance of artistic luminaries Oskar Schlemmer, Paul Klee, and Wassily Kandinsky.  Bill had returned to Switzerland in 1929, and it was while living in Zürich that he received...