materials

Cooper-Hewitt: Design Revolution


Join us for a discussion with Emily Pilloton, author of Design Revolution, Allan Chochinov, founder of Core77, Susan Szenasy Editor in Chief of Metropolis Magazine, and Cynthia E.
Emily Pilloton, Design Revolution, Allan Chochinov, Core77, Cynthia Smith, curator, Susan Szenasy, Metropolis Magazine, materials, sustainability, product design, Project H Design, panel, talk, long, program

Why Design Now?: AGV (automotrice á grande vitesse) [high-speed self-propelled train]


Why? Trains are among the most sustainable forms of transportation, and the AGV is at the forefront of high-speed, energy-efficient train design. Ninety-eight percent of the train is built from recyclable materials, its traction systems and low weight are energy-efficient, and its permanent-magnet synchronous motors and regenerative braking system create electricity and minimize energy loss.
AGV, automotrice á grande vitesse, trains, high speed, self-propelled, recyclable, materials, energy efficient, Alstom, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: Learning Landscape


Why? Learning Landscape is a universal, adaptable approach to elementary math education. This simple grid of half-submerged tires can be built anywhere in the world from cast-off materials. Using chalk to mark numbers on the tires, teachers and students play games that mobilize the natural excitement of group competition and physical movement. The concept comes from Project H Design, a not-for-profit organization that uses design to improve the quality of human life.
Learning Landscape, education, primary, elementary, math, mathematics, GRiD, tires, materials, active, activity, Project H Design, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: IF Mode Folding Bicycle


Why? Most folding bicycles are heavy and difficult to collapse. Conceived as portable luggage, the IF Mode is made of lightweight materials and eliminates oily chains, complex tubes, hidden dirt traps, and much of the clutter of conventional bicycles. As mobility systems become more interconnected, portable, folding designs like this will facilitate transfers between different modes of transportation.
IF Mode folding bicycle, portable, lightweight, materials, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: Vault201


Why? Preindustrial construction methods can provide fundamental lessons about sustainable design and environmental impact today. In this site-specific installation, thin tile vaults stretching across large spaces without formwork is part of a 700-year-old construction method that is energy-efficient, utilizes local materials, and achieves high structural strength. All of these factors have important applications in the developing world, where low-cost construction and durability are model standards for any building project.
Vault 201, MIT, construction, methods, sustainable design, environmental impact, materials, developing world, applications, low cost, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: E/S Orcelle cargo carrier


Why? Oceangoing ships present significant health, pollution, and efficiency challenges. The concept vessel E/S Orcelle is designed to be propelled without oil. Made of lightweight materials, it relies on energy sources obtained at sea—solar energy collected through photovoltaic panels in the sails, wind energy obtained through propulsion sails, and wave energy from fins, which can be transformed into hydrogen, electricity, or mechanical energy.
E/S Orcelle, cargo, carrier, ship, shipping, lightweight, materials, renewable energy, energy sources, carbon, emissions, reduction, Why Design Now, Triennial, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: Contour Crafting


Why? Contour Crafting is a construction technology that potentially reduces energy use and emissions by using a rapid-prototype or 3-D printing process to fabricate large components. Comprised of robotic arms and extrusion nozzles, a computer-controlled gantry system moves the nozzle back and forth, squeezing out layers of concrete or other material to fabricate a form. The ultimate goal is to print a house in a day while drastically reducing material and energy consumption.
Contour Crafting, Center for Rapid Automated Fabrication Technologies, construction, consumption, materials, energy, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Cooper-Hewitt: Material Use


francois azambourg, eben bayer, dafna alsheh, andrew dent, andrew h. dent, Matilda McQuaid, national design triennial, why design now?, cooper-hewitt, smithsonian, design, materials, Designer, icestone, ecovative, lin 94, BEES, Material Connexion, panel, talk, long, public program

Cooper-Hewitt: An Evening with the Campana Brothers


Fernando and Humberto Campana take a low-tech, artisanal approach to design, employing sustainable, readily available, and often recycled materials to craft high design. Together, the two brothers have designed idiosyncratic, evocative, and sometimes humorous works for Edra and H. Stern, among others. Held in conjunction with the opening of Campana Brothers Select: Works from the Permanent Collection, Cooper-Hewitt invites Roberto Stern of H. Stern and Giuliana Michelotti of Edra to join Curatorial Director Cara McCarty and the Campanas in a discussion of their work.
Campana Brothers Select, Exhibition, Campana Brothers, Fernando Campana, Humberto Campana, Designer, low-tech, sustainable, recycled, materials, Roberto Stern, Giuliana Michelotti, panel, talk, long, public program

DesignBoost NYC: David Gresham


DesignBoost NYC was a two-day design conference held at Cooper-Hewitt in June 2011. Thirteen speakers specializing in everything from biomechanics to filmmaking addressed the conference's theme, "Design Beyond Design" in this series of short talks.
DesignBoost, 2011, conference, Design beyond Design, David Gresham, Material Connexion, consulting, materials, innovation, technology transfer, nasa, nike, adidas, chilewich, liquid metal, apple, screen, library, talk, long

Pages