construction

Searching for Perfection


Richard Meier’s Getty Center, which sits atop a hill in Santa Monica, is, arguably, the last great building of the 20th century. While some liken the complex to a fortified Tuscan hill town, and Meier himself says that he was thinking of Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli or the Villa Farnese in Caprarola, it reminds me of another ancient hilltop complex, the Parthenon.
Richard Meier, J. Paul Getty Center, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Hadrian, Tivoli, Villa Farnese, Caprarola, Parthenon, Athens, Le Corbusier, Architecture, San Diego Freeway, stone, GRiD, Getty Research Institute, construction, drawing

Why Design Now?: Loblolly House


Why? Loblolly House is comprised entirely of readymade components and elements fabricated off-site, reducing assembly time while increasing energy efficiency. The house comprises four key architectural elements: scaffold, cartridge, block, and equipment. The aluminum scaffold system provides the structural frame as well as the means to join the other three elements, using only a wrench. Smart cartridge panels distribute heat, water, ventilation, and electricity throughout the house
Loblolly House, Process of New Architecture, Readymade, Energy efficiency, assembly, construction, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: Vault201


Why? Preindustrial construction methods can provide fundamental lessons about sustainable design and environmental impact today. In this site-specific installation, thin tile vaults stretching across large spaces without formwork is part of a 700-year-old construction method that is energy-efficient, utilizes local materials, and achieves high structural strength. All of these factors have important applications in the developing world, where low-cost construction and durability are model standards for any building project.
Vault 201, MIT, construction, methods, sustainable design, environmental impact, materials, developing world, applications, low cost, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: Mapungubwe National Park Interpretive Center


Why? Preindustrial construction methods can provide fundamental lessons about sustainable design and environmental impact today. In this site-specific installation, thin tile vaults stretching across large spaces without formwork is part of a 700-year-old construction method that is energy-efficient, utilizes local materials, and achieves high structural strength. All of these factors have important applications in the developing world, where low-cost construction and durability are model standards for any building project.
Mapungubwe National Park Interpretive Center, low cost, construction, durability, developing world, application, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Why Design Now?: Contour Crafting


Why? Contour Crafting is a construction technology that potentially reduces energy use and emissions by using a rapid-prototype or 3-D printing process to fabricate large components. Comprised of robotic arms and extrusion nozzles, a computer-controlled gantry system moves the nozzle back and forth, squeezing out layers of concrete or other material to fabricate a form. The ultimate goal is to print a house in a day while drastically reducing material and energy consumption.
Contour Crafting, Center for Rapid Automated Fabrication Technologies, construction, consumption, materials, energy, Why Design Now, Exhibition

Cooper-Hewitt's RE:DESIGN


RE:DESIGN, 2011, Capital Campaign, renovation, construction, Carnegie mansion, Miller-Fox townhouses, adaptation, 21st century

Studio Visit to Selldorf Architects


Selldorf Architects, located at Manhattan’s Union Square, recently opened their studio to Cooper-Hewitt’s Design Watch Members.
Selldorf Architects, Architecture, New York City, NYC, studio, tour, Design Watch, members, SIMS, municipal, recycling, facility, building, construction, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, recyclables, Annette Selldorf, National Design Award, nda, finalist

Straw and Earth


An energy-efficient straw bale house is being built on the Mall, across the street from the US Capitol. Natural builders from around the country converged on Washington DC to construct the straw shelter and a bamboo shade structure. 
straw, bale, house, Mall, Washington, DC, natural, Green, builders, Rose Morin, Builders Without Borders, strength, simplicity, buildings, eco-house, US Botanic Garden, One Planet- Ours, sustainability, displays, Exhibition, United Nations, Environment Program, Department of Energy, DOE, construction, climate, Finland, Mexico, insulation, waste, energy, reduction, materials, cost, housing, shortage, solution, appropriate

Making Vermelha Chair


The Vermelha chair is an iconic piece, originally conceived and prototyped in 1993 for a gallery show in São Paulo along with several other pieces. The construction of the chair is very time-intensive, as it is handmade from a huge length of rope wrapped and woven to create the chair’s structure
Vermehla Chair, chair, Campana Brothers, Fernando Campana, Humberto Campana, Brazil, product design, Industrial Design, construction, handmade, rope, woven, time consuming, cynicism, critical reception, Massimo Morozzi, Edra, Mel Byer, book, 50 Chairs, step-by-step, video, how to, bestseller, hand-crafted, mass-produced, furniture design

Voûte Nubienne Affordable Housing


In sub-Saharan Africa, traditional building techniques are no longer feasible; due to increased deforestation use of timber for roofing and posts is not viable
Africa, sub-Sahara, building, architectural techniques, traditional, deforestation, feasible, materials, timber, local, roofing, posts, adaptation, Sudan, Asia, West Africa, affordable, low-cost, housing, alternative, Voute Nubienne, Nubian Vault, mud, bricks, sun, construction, vaulted, communities, Earth Roofs in the Sahel, Association La Voûte Nubienne, option, imports, Burkina Faso, training, entrepreneurs, apprentice, Mali, Senegal, Togo, Ivory Coast

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