offset lithography

Pushing Beyond the Frame


This poster, entitled Big Nudes, was originally displayed in 1967 at the School of Visual Arts Gallery in Gramercy to announce an exhibition of large nude paintings. This poster is the work of American graphic designer and illustrator Milton Glaser. Glaser has designed more than 400 posters, record-covers, illustrations, magazine covers and advertisements throughout his prolific and diverse career.
Milton Glaser, graphic design, poster, advertising, Exhibition, nude, offset lithography

Psychedlic Promotion


The Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco was “ground zero” for the counterculture revolution of the 1960s. The so-called psychedelic subculture that emerged in the Haight explored new possibilities in art and living that stemmed from a desire to remake American culture. The artistic endeavors of this community, be it poetry, theater, dance or music, were expressed in weekly “concerts” held in two primary venues.
Lee Conklin, psychedlic, poster, graphic design, advertising, concert poster, Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco, offset lithography

A Mystical Advertisment


Tadanori Yokoo’s designs are the result of an effortless combination of eclectic visual motifs from across time and borders. In this poster for Kanox, a Japanese production company involved with television, film radio, stage and commercial advertising, Yokoo juxtaposes classical architecture from an Italian Renaissance villa with a surrealist galaxy filled with brightly colored celestial bodies. Though the poster’s subject doesn’t immediately seem relevant to the business of production, the composition alludes to the innovative and inventive nature of Kanox.
Tadanori Yokoo, poster, graphic design, offset lithography, advertising

Ribbons in the Sky


With its dancing roll of printing ribbon, diving between a checkerboard game of multi-colored squares and symbols, this ad for Olivetti’s Divisumma adding machine makes simple mathematics look like anything but just another day at the office.
Hebert Bayer, Olivetti, advertising, poster, offset lithography, graphic design

Out With the Old, In With the “Nowy”


What makes this theater new? The theater the text refers to depicts a historical landmark that represented a shift between the two World Wars and Poland’s sole source of entertainment at the time. The antithesis of the old Polski Theater, calling it the New Theater suggested a less serious, light hearted genre. The founder of New Theatre was Mieczysław Rutkowski. Throughout a twenty year time span, many directors held positions there and various dramas and concerts were performed. By the 1980’s the theater became known for its political involvement, a prime example of this being the performance staged in 1980 entitled "The Defendant:  June 1956". This political performance references the The Poznań 1956 protests, also known as Poznań 1956 uprising. The working class were protesting against communist dictatorial government and better working conditions. The protest resulted in many injuries to the Polish people and a period of political persecution.
Poznań 1956 protests, Nowy Teatr, film, performance, Warsaw, offset lithography

Nothing to Prouvé


Born on today’s date in 1901, Jean Prouvé was among the most well-known French designers and architects of the mid-twentieth century. He was the son of Victor Prouvé, one of the founders of l’Ecole de Nancy—an Art Nouveau artist collective. This early exposure instilled in Prouvé the idea that art and industry were inherently linked, a concept he sought to express throughout his career.
Jean Prouvé, Victor Prouvé, L’Ecole de Nancy, Art Nouveau, Siegfried Odermatt, Museum für Gestaltung, Erasmus University, prefabrication, industrial materials, Architecture, Rosmarie Tissi, Dutch graphic design, graphic design, poster, offset lithography

Who is the Man Behind the Design?


There is—literally—a man behind the design of the post office in Pieter Brattinga’s (1931-2004) De Man Achter de Vormgeving van de P.T.T. This poster is for a 1960 exhibition by the Dutch postal service, the PTT (then the Staatsbedrijf der Posterijen, Telegrafie en Telefonie; now the Koninklijke PTT Nederland). The PTT, founded in the nineteenth century, has promoted contemporary art since the 1920s through stamp designs and by sponsoring exhibitions.
Pieter Brattinga, Dutch graphic design, offset lithography, poster, graphic design, layering, Koninklijke PTT Nederland, Netherlands

Simple Yet Bold


Born on today's date in 1930, Ikko Tanaka was one of the giants of Japanese graphic design in the second half of the twentieth century. Tanaka began designing posters in 1954 and was renowned for his ability to synthesize both Japanese and Western aesthetics. His name became synonymous with straightforward, impressive designs recognizable for their universality.
Ikko Tanaka, Pieter Brattinga, Japanese graphic design, Dutch graphic design, offset lithography, poster, geometry, Netherlands, graphic design

Shocked and Appealed


Well, this is certainly pugnacious—but what propaganda isn’t, really? It takes no learned scholar to discern that this poster means business. Euphemism wasn’t really of interest to the United States in December 1941, when its resistance to entering World War II was abruptly terminated by the infamous events in Pearl Harbor. The nation was catapulted into the global turmoil that had already blurred national boundaries and sent refugees seeking shelter in other countries all over the world.
World War II, propaganda, Cubism, Jean Carlu, posters, graphic design, offset lithography

Designer (Advertised) Jeans


While recent advertising has been overwhelmingly digital, the contemporary graphic designer and former National Design Award winner, Stefan Sagmeister, relishes the opportunity to use his considerable graphic talent and imagination to create posters the traditional way, through photo offset lithography. These posters are deliberately human and personal, in response to the “cold” modernist design of some of his colleagues. In general, Sagmeister searches for ideas that elicit sensual or emotional responses from the viewer.
Sagmeister Inc., Stefan Sagmeister, Levi's, Denim, jeans, thread, clothing, graphic design, Los Angeles, San Francisco, advertising, poster, offset lithography