illustration

Call of the Wild


Animal Kingdom is a beautifully illustrated wallpaper design by Edgar Miller. The design contains line illustrations of eleven different animals and birds which include a pelican, dog, horse and lion, each a wonderful caricature of an identifiable species. They are drawn in a gestural fashion with a splash of white filling in the creature’s body.
wallpaper, Edgar Miller, illustration, 1950s, animal

All The World's A Fair


When F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby in 1925, the Valley of Ashes he described as “fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens,” was a very real place. This wasteland between Brooklyn and Queens was known as the Corona Dump, where the Brooklyn Ash Removal Company disposed of the vast quantities of coal burned in New York furnaces. It may be hard to imagine, but the bright and beautiful scene gracing the cover of this issue of the New Yorker from 1939 is the very same place!  
Ilonka Karasz, New Yorker, magazine, illustration, New York, world's fair, party, Robert Moses, F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Washington

Love Garden


Garden designers and brothers André and Paul Vera designed stunning landscape architecture that reflected the changing mode of the early 20thcentury and the shift toward rational modernism. Their unique vocabulary of geometric forms, symmetry and bold color contrasts, helped usher in the Art Moderne style, applying it not to just furniture and architecture, but the natural world as well.
André Vera, Paul Vera, landscape architecture, drawing, illustration, Garden, garden design, Atelier Francais, Louis Sue, rationality

Baby, It's Cold Outside!


With the temperature outside at record lows this week, I can’t help but think of William Henry Bradley’s The Blue Lady.  Clutching her ice skates in her left hand, she makes a cold winter’s stroll through the thin, bare trees look elegant and placid.  (It is a sad contrast to the bundle of blue layers I’ve been hunkered down in as I head for the subway).
William Henry Bradley, Winter, poster, The Chap-Book, illustration, magazine, graphic design, Art Nouveau, blue, cold, lithography, Edward McKnight Kauffer, advertising, California, American Airlines

Silk and the City


The cityscape is a natural subject for textile design—grid-based, repetitive and boldly geometric-- well, at least Manhattan after the skyscraper boom of the 1920s and 30s. The Museum has numerous designs with the city as inspiration, including designs by Philip Johnson, Alexander Girard, Lydia Bush Brown, and Arthur Sanderson & Sons. (If you have a piece of Manhattan by Ruth Reeves you’d like to donate, we’d love to hear from you!)
Clayton Knight, cityscapes, Manhattan, Stehli Silks, Kneeland Green, Edward Steichen, Helen Wallis, jazz, illustration

I Read It in a Magazine


No one can resist flipping through the pages of a magazine—in waiting rooms, while traveling, or anywhere. One that I love to browse through, and one that is popular among our library’s users, is the “women’s magazine,” Modern Priscilla (1887-1930). Originally focused on dress patterns, china painting, and needlework, the magazine’s scope was subsequently enlarged to cover other aspects of women's home life.
magazines, Periodicals, Modern Priscilla, Fortune magazine, Smithsonian Libraries, illustration, graphic design, National Design Library

High Fashion Train Interior


Of all of the pioneering industrial designers, including Norman Bel Geddes, Walter Dorwin Teague, and Henry Dreyfuss, Raymond Loewy is by far most well-known to the American public. His designs for the original Coca-Cola contour bottle and logo, the Exxon logo, and the Avanti car are icons of 1950s and 1960s design.
Raymond Loewy, Henry Dreyfuss, Industrial Design, Pennsylvania Railroad, trains, illustration, concept drawings, drawing

Fritz Kredel, Woodcutter and Book Illustrator/Hermann Zapf, Calligrapher and Type Designer: A Joint Exhibition


Fritz Kredel, Hermann Zapf, illustration, calligraphy, woodcuts, prints, book jackets, book plates, typography

Fantastic Illustration and Design in Britain, 1850–1930


An exhibition of illustrated fairies, folk tales, animals, and phantasmagoric scenes as primarily rendered in original drawings, with a selection of books, furniture, ceramics, and other items of decorative art. Some of the artists whose imaginations are on display include Randolph Caldecott, Walter Crane, Edmund Dulac, Kate Greenaway, Edward Lear, Sir Edward Burne-Jones, Beatrtix Potter, Arthur Rackham, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Ernest Howard Shepard, and Sir John Tenniel. 
illustration, animals, illustrated books, furniture, ceramics, decorative objects, Britain, traveling exhibitions, ch:exhibition=35349967

Magazine Covers: Art for the People


The American and European magazine covers in this exhibition date from the mid-19th century to the present, and include titles such as The Illustrated London News, Punch, Le Rire, Domus, Camera, Harper's Weekly, and The New Yorker, as well as experimental Dadaist and Constructivist art publications.
magazine covers, graphic design, illustration, Periodicals, exhibitions

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