Herbert Matter

Montana


Throughout the 1940s, the graphic designer E. McKnight Kauffer created numerous book jackets for Harcourt Brace, Alfred Knopf and others as well as his illustrated version of The Complete Poems and Stories of Edgar Allan Poe which was published in 1946. In the same year he received a commission from the Container Corporation of America to produce a magazine advertisement for the ‘United States’ series – in which all forty-eight states were represented.
E. McKnight Kauffer, Montana, graphic design, advertising, landscape, Container Corporation of America, Edgar Allan Poe, T. S. Eliot, Man Ray, Herbert Matter, Herbert Bayer, A. M. Cassandre, Jean Carlu

How Can You Not Love That Glove?


How can you not love that glove? It takes up nearly half the image, so bold yet enigmatic. The gloved hand and the face of the exuberant young woman are likely separate images, brought together—brought into meaning with each other—purely by their adjacency. The photomontage does not quite read as a coherent image, but as a set of concentric ideas, an image more potent than a single photograph of both objects could capture.
Herbert Matter, Swiss graphic design, poster, photomontage, Switzerland, Norway, Engelberg, Trubsee, Herbert Bayer, travel

Good Vibrations


Stare into the electric blue shades of this woman’s sunglasses and what do you see?  Even if you know what you are looking for, the blue letterforms come together to form coherent words only with sustained visual focus.  If you were to advertise a concert that you wanted people to come to, would you make it this difficult for your audience to find out about it?  Or could it be that the designer had something else in mind?
Victor Moscoso, San Francisco, The Chambers Brothers, Josef Albers, Herbert Matter, Yale University, Cooper Union, color theory, New York, poster, lithography, Neon Rose, Wes Wilson, Stanley Mouse, Rick Griffin, typography, graphic design

Two Matters of Importance


Two articles in the May issue of Dwell magazine have special resonance for Cooper-Hewitt’s followers. The first, “Printed Matter” by Aaron Britt, concerns the life and work of the Swiss-born graphic designer Herbert Matter; the second, “20th-Century Fox” by Leslie Williamson, discusses the collaboration of Eero Saarinen, Alexander Girard, and Dan Kiley on the seminal J. Irwin Miller house in Columbus, IN.
Herbert Matter, graphic designer, collaboration, Eero Saarinen, Alexander Girard, textiles, Dan Kiley, Miller house, Dwell