Cubism

Art Deco: Cubism and Classical Tradition


If  c.1900 - 1914 the international avant-garde held sway over the cultural life of Paris, the period immediately following World War I -- often referred to as the "return to order" --  saw a renewal of French cultural values -- that is, "tradition" and, of course, "Classicism."  When these values in design were touched by the lingering spirit of the avant-garde, the result was one of the most successful and admired styles of the 20th century:  Art Deco.
Terry Ryan, Art Deco, Louis Sue, Andre Mare, Architectures, National Design Library, Cubism, La Compagnie dea Arts Francais, Paul Valery

Did Hofman have a change of heart?


Quirky and interesting, this elevation caught my eye as an object of the day to write about. I was especially drawn to the work, “Elevation Design for a Sitting Room, with Sofa, Two Chairs and Table”, because recently, the Cooper-Hewitt had a wonderful exhibit, House Proud, which was a look into 19th century rooms through watercolors. I wondered if there was any link to these room studies. But, this elevation, also a watercolor, was done later, in 1919.
Hofman, hexagon, Rondo, Cubism, Minimalist, decor

Is that really a textile?


At first glance, Figures with Still Life, designed by Ruth Reeves, looks like a modern art painting. I did a double take when I realized it was, instead, a screen printed textile on plain weave. Throughout her career, Reeves designed a variety of objects in modern styles including tapestries, wall hangings, wall fabrics, carpeting, and dresses. 
Ruth Reeves, Art Deco, Cubism, figures representing daily life, wall hanging

Getting There is Half the Fun


Or, perhaps, not actually a proportional half-and-half. Edward McKnight Kauffer’s series of posters for American Airlines focuses on the destination (such as Chicago or Niagara Falls) rather than the air travel itself. From this perspective, being there is more than half the fun.
advertising, American Airlines, Edward McKnight Kauffer, Cubism, abstraction, graphic design, poster

Shocked and Appealed


Well, this is certainly pugnacious—but what propaganda isn’t, really? It takes no learned scholar to discern that this poster means business. Euphemism wasn’t really of interest to the United States in December 1941, when its resistance to entering World War II was abruptly terminated by the infamous events in Pearl Harbor. The nation was catapulted into the global turmoil that had already blurred national boundaries and sent refugees seeking shelter in other countries all over the world.
World War II, propaganda, Cubism, Jean Carlu, posters, graphic design, offset lithography

Czech Cubism: Architecture and Design


An exploration of Prague's vibrant Cubism movement, which thrived between 1910 and 1925. The majority of the furniture, architectural renderings, ceramics, and metalwork on display are on loan from the Museum of Decorative Arts and the National Technical Museum, both in Prague. This traveling exhibition was organized by the Vitra Design Museum in Weil-am-Rhein in collaboration with Prague's Museum of Decorative Arts and its National Technical Museum.
Cubism, Prague, Czech, 20th century, furniture, ceramics, Architecture, architectural drawings, metalwork, traveling exhibitions