18th century

Put An Owl On It


Owls are nocturnal birds that are characterized in most people’s memories as wise creatures, perched up on their branch overlooking the world’s activities; always awake, eyes never closed.  In my memory, owls are the talisman of a childhood favorite lollipop, the tootsie roll pop. The mind burning question of: “How Many Licks Does It Take To Get To The Center Of A Tootsie Pop?” The answer of course being, “The world may never know.”
owl, birds, textiles, 18th century, sewing, Portlandia, Hewitt sisters, Pinterest

Cockfight chair


As eighteenth-century English printers produced increasing numbers of books and members of the upper classes read more, the private study or library and its furnishings became an important part of the domestic interior. This chair is one of the earliest examples of specialized furniture with functions specific to reading. Designed so a male reader could sit astride facing the adjustable book ledge, the chair features a candle holder in one arm and a tray for writing implements in the other.
chair, domestic interior, library, furniture, 18th century

Bingo!


"Cavagnole!" This is something we might hear today if this 18th-century game still being played. Cavagnole, a pre-modern version of bingo, was much more than just an ordinary board game—its aesthetic appeal reflected the culture, beauty, and art forms revered in the height of its popularity.
Cavagnole, board game, Europe, 18th century, play, games, paintings, gilding

Vive la France! Vive Chantilly! Vive Elegance!


Kakiemon, the  famed Japanese originator of the style that bears this name,  was the first to bring enamel to the fabric of porcelain in 17th-century Japan. Kakiemon decoration was of very high quality, known for its delicate and asymmetric—yet well balanced—designs.
Kakiemon, Porcelain, France, Louis XV, Chantilly, 18th century

Family Registers and Family Legends


Considered a genteel accomplishment, needlework was an important component of female education in colonial and federal America. Family register samplers,  such as this late 18th century example worked by twelve-year-old Alicia Lawrence (1787–1866) of Hartford, Connecticut, were frequently made during the later phase of girls’ needlework training, and were a popular way of documenting and preserving family histories.
sampler, family register, Alicia Lawrence, Charles Sheldon, Alice Adams, Nathan Hale, William Lawrence, embroidery, 18th century, needlework

Extreme Mending


When we talk about sustainability, why don’t we talk about mending? The Netherlands-based Platform 21=Repairing project and its offshoot, Repair Cafés, do just that. Platform 21=Repairing published a manifesto extolling the benefits of mending, and the Repair Cafés bring together skilled tinkerers and those with items in need of repair together in a free social space over tea and coffee.
sampler, repair, sustainability, Dutch, Netherlands, 18th century

Italian Drawings for Jewelry 1700-1875


jewelry, drawings, Italy, Italian, permanent collection, 18th century, 19th century

Printed Textiles 1760-1860 in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


Publication design: Mentkya/Schlott
textiles, textile design, textile printing, fabric, 18th century, 19th century, permanent collection, ch:exhibition=35349321

Cooper-Hewitt: Contemporary Architecture and the Legacy of Piranesi


Some of the most significant architects of our era have cited designer and architect Giovanni Battista Piranesi's influence on their work. Learn how architects Peter Eisenman, Founder and Principal, Eisenman Architects; Michael Graves, Founder and Principal, Michael Graves & Associates; and Robert Venturi, Principal of Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates are inspired by Piranesi's eclectic and imaginative approach to his designs. Stan Allen, Principle of Stan Allen Architect and Dean of the School of Architecture at Princeton University, moderates the discussion.
Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Piranesi, Piranesi as Designer, Exhibition, influence, legacy, Architecture, 18th century, Italian, contemporary, Peter Eisenman, Michael Graves, Robert Venturi, Stan Allen, architect, panel, talk, long, public program

Cooper-Hewitt: Rococo, The Continuing Curve


From its inception, exuberant, organic, and sensuous rococo style has inspired subsequent revivals and new movements. As rococo's influence once again gains momentum, Cooper-Hewitt invites scholars Laura Auricchio and Paul Greenhalgh to discuss the social and cultural histories behind rococo in eighteenth-century France and its revival in Art Nouveau at the end of the nineteenth century.
rococo, continuing curve, Exhibition, 18th century, France, 19th century, revival, Art Nouveau, Laura Auricchio, Paul Greenhalgh, gail davidson, talk, long, public program

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