Color blanket, 2014, designed by Paul Maute (German, 1897–1982), produced by Knoll Textiles (USA), manufactured in Scotland, wool and rayon plain weave, Gift of Knoll Textiles, 2015-30-10
Cato’s Appeal
Knoll introduced Cato in 1961 and it has been in continuous production ever since, making it one of the most successful designs the company ever produced. It was designed and woven by Paul Maute, a German designer/weaver whose contributions to Knoll Textiles were both influential and lasting. In 1927, Maute established his weaving workshop in...
Hanging, 1955–1975, California, USA, silk and synthetic metallic double cloth, Gift of Mr. Eric and Mrs. Sylvia Elsesser, The Trude Guermonprez Archives, 1993-121-25
Layered and Textured Grid
Trude Guermonprez was a much-admired weaver and professor of textile arts at California College of Art. She was trained at the School of Fine and Applied Arts in Halle, Germany, sometimes called the “little Bauhaus,” as many of its faculty had studied or taught there. After World War II, she made her way to California...
Panel: Sandune, Australia, 1991, machine knit cotton, Produced by Coogi Australia.
Notorious Coogi
This cotton panel displays the signature elements that have come to make Coogi a recognizable brand worldwide. With asymmetrical lines, a variety of different textures, and a plethora of bright colors this fabric offers all the energetic vibrancy associated with the Coogi brand. For many people today the name Coogi calls to mind the particular...
Textile, "Wool Dot Gather"
Dots and Stripes
Wool Dot Gather, designed by Osamu Mita and manufactured at his family’s textile company, Mitasho, is made of wool and rayon. The textile has a very rich textural surface created by a combination of patterning in the weaving process, as well as shrinking in the finishing. The white plain woven wool forms both the dots...
Janice Arnold Sketches
During a visit to Cooper-Hewitt about a year and a half ago, West-coast felt-maker Janice Arnold was intrigued by the form of the museum’s conservatory. Its domed roof and iron mullions resemble the radiating struts of the framework of a yurt—the circular tent dwelling of the nomadic tribes who first created felt. Next week, Arnold...