wallpaper

Kindergarten Cut-Outs


The Schmitz-Horning Company was founded in Cleveland, Ohio in 1905 and was known for its lithographed borders and scenic wallpapers. One of its early papers was “Kindergarten Cut-Outs,” the first interactive wallpaper designed for children. These papers were sold as five-foot long panels at a cost of one dollar per panel. The paper in the Museum’s collection is not a full panel­—as you can see, the cat has been cut in half.
wallpaper, nursery, dog, rabbit, animals, lithograph, Schmitz-Horning Company

The House that Jack Built


Walter Crane was introduced to the arts early in life as the second son of Thomas Crane, a portrait painter and miniaturist. The younger Crane was apprenticed to a wood engraver at an early age and also began enrolling in drawing classes. He illustrated his first children’s books in the 1860s, working under Edmund Evans. Children’s wallpapers first appeared in the 1870s and were printed by engraved copper rollers in a monochromatic sepia colorway.
nursery, wallpaper, aesthetic, dog, cat, 19th century, nursery rhyme, children's books

"Arches" from the Mezzotone Papers


Ilonka Karasz (1896-1981) designed in a variety of media, including wallpaper, silver, textiles, and furniture, but was probably best known for her New Yorker magazine cover illustrations. She designed 186 covers in total beginning in 1925. She was the first woman admitted to the Royal School of Arts and Crafts in Budapest. After emigrating from Hungary to the United States in 1913, Karasz became one of few women working in the design field.
mural, trees, birds, surreal, panorama, wallpaper, Ilonka Karasz

Grand Canal


Bandboxes, such as the one I wrote about earlier this month, were widely used in the first half of the 19th century and were precursors to the modern shopping bag. The decorative papers that covered bandbox exteriors were usually very crudely printed with just a few colors and often closely resemble folk art.
bandbox, Erie Canal, wallpaper, block-print, pasteboard, 19th century

Eagle Engine No. 13


Popular between 1800 and 1850, bandboxes were originally designed to store and protect the ruffled and starched collar bands fashionable for men at the time. They were also used for transporting and storing hats and as general carry-alls. Bandboxes were generally constructed of pasteboard, while the more expensive models were composed of wood.
bandbox, wallpaper, fire engine, pasteboard, block-print

Le Corbusier's Walls


Although he was also a designer, painter and writer, Le Corbusier is known primarily as an architect. And, like many prominent early 20th-century architects, Le Corbusier believed in the importance of a completely designed environment. His first collection of wallpapers, designed in 1931, consisted mainly of solid colors that he referred to as a color keyboard.
wallpaper, Le Corbusier, Salubra, Architecture, interior design

Popular objects


Once a month the Digital & Emerging Media team will be reporting back on how objects in the collection circulate online. And here's our first missive.
permanent collection, embroidery, sampler, Kodak, camera, Peter Pan, wallpaper, doorplate, Saul Bass

All That Glisters: Thirty Centuries of Golden Deception


gold, gilding, decorative objects, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, costume, jewelry, Glass, leatherwork, needlework, wallpaper

Wallpaper: A Picture-Book of Examples in the Collection of the Cooper Union Museum


wallpaper, permanent collection, wallcoverings

Wallpaper in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


Publication design: Heidi Humphrey
wallpaper, wall coverings, permanent collection, ch:exhibition=35350181

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