textiles

New Day


Often called "England’s Eamses," Robin and Lucienne Day were a designing couple utterly committed to modernism. The unexpectedness and vitality of their postwar interior furnishings, particularly Lucienne’s pattern designs for textiles, carpets, wallcoverings, and dishware, shaped the look of modern England in the 1950s.
Robin Day, Lucienne Day, Festival of Britain, Calyx, Paul Klee, textiles, textile design, england, 20th century, interiors

Andean woman’s mantle


This beautiful cloth is a woman’s shoulder mantle, called a lliclla in the Quechua language of the Inca Empire, and was made during the colonial period of Peru. A perfect blend of the cross-cultural elements of the 16th- and 17th-century era of global trade, the Chinese silk and Spanish silver threads are woven with Inca techniques and design motifs.
textiles, woven, weaving, thread, Peru, Inca, Andes

Alvin Lustig’s Incantation


Although his career was tragically short, Alvin Lustig was among America’s most influential mid-century graphic designers. Textiles like Incantation (1947) reflect a rich multidisciplinary practice that encompassed furniture, graphics, architecture, and animation. After studying design and printing at Los Angeles Junior College, Lustig started creating geometric patterns in the medium of letterpress in the early 1930s.
Alvin Lustig, Laverne Originals, Paul Klee, Joan Miro, Elaine Lustig Cohen, textiles

Crocodile


Japanese textile designer, Junichi Arai (b.1932), said that the crucial problem for contemporary textile makers is choosing and blending the myriad of available materials, tools, and technologies. He explains that history should be the maker’s guide, as there have been passionate efforts dedicated to making better fibers, textiles, and garments.
Junichi Arai, Japan, textiles, melt-off

Abacus


Among the most influential books in the history of American graphic design is Paul Rand’s Thoughts on Design, published in 1947. Covering the jacket of this ground-breaking manifesto of modernist theory and practice is a series of oblong dots arranged in uneven rows, rendered in translucent shades of gray. The image is based on a photogram, made by exposing a wood-and-wire abacus to a sheet of photographic paper. At once abstract and recognizable, the photogram is a direct imprint of a physical object.
textiles, graphic design, abacus, Paul Rand, photogram, L. Anton Maix

Enhancing the View


Weaver and designer Dorothy Liebes owed much of her success to her ability to create textiles that complemented and enhanced mid-century modern architecture. Using windows to bring the outside in was an integral part of the period's new design for living. Multiple large windows became a standard feature in new homes, often replacing fireplaces as the focal point of the main room. 
Dorothy Liebes, weaving, modern architecture, window treatments, interiors, textiles

Beautiful Ladies


Admirers of this exquisite tapestry fragment woven in medieval Spain fondly refer to it as "the Drinking Ladies"—an apt description for the two pairs of beautifully-robed women who lift their cups and bottle in salutation. The Drinking Ladies communicates the pleasures of female companionship amid the sumptuous environment of the wealthier classes. This was the time when the Alhambra was in its greatest splendor, with every surface of the royal residence covered in elaborate decoration.
tapestry, slit tapestry, Anni Albers, textiles, weaving, spain, Alhambra, Bauhaus

Stitches in Time: An Exhibition of Embroideries and Needlework Techniques


embroidery, needlework, handicrafts, samplers, textiles, fabric

All That Glisters: Thirty Centuries of Golden Deception


gold, gilding, decorative objects, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, costume, jewelry, Glass, leatherwork, needlework, wallpaper

Design by the Yard: Textile Printing from 800 to 1956


textiles, textile design, textile printing, fabrics, apparel, fashion

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