paintings

Bingo!


"Cavagnole!" This is something we might hear today if this 18th-century game still being played. Cavagnole, a pre-modern version of bingo, was much more than just an ordinary board game—its aesthetic appeal reflected the culture, beauty, and art forms revered in the height of its popularity.
Cavagnole, board game, Europe, 18th century, play, games, paintings, gilding

Hauntingly Beautiful: Frederic Edwin Church’s Parthenon Sketch


Home of the mythological goddess Athena, the Parthenon is a hauntingly sacred place where the air is ominously rife with magic. Or, at least, that is the mood evoked in Frederic Edwin Church’s (1826-1900) oil sketch of the Parthenon. To create this effect, Church chose to paint the building from below, giving the impression that it looms over the viewer. In reality, this particular view of the Parthenon does not exist, but is rather contrived from composite views and memory. The contrast of red and blue illumination was also almost certainly invented by the artist.
Frederic Edwin Church, Thomas Cole, Parthenon, Hudson River School, Romanticism, artificial lighting, Greece, composite view, Metropolitan Museum of Art, American landscape, Architecture, columns, icebergs, nature, Athena, mythology, paintings

William Stanley Haseltine


drawings, paintings, oil paintings, watercolor

Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Drawings in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


Publication design: Sue Koch
drawings, paintings, landscapes, American, 19th century, permanent collection

Design [R]evolutions: Places for Paintings and Paintings for Places


It is difficult to believe that the works of art we now see in museums were originally intended for display someplace else. The inaugural speaker for Desigh [R]evolutions, Dr. Nicholas Penny will discuss where several famous paintings now in public galleries were originally intended to hang, and how lighting, heigh, wall color, frames, and the functions of rooms exerted a decisive influence on the artists who painted them.
Design [R]evolutions, Lecture, Enid and Lester Historic Design Lecture series, Dr. Nicholas Penny, paintings, galleries history, talk, long, public program

Winslow Homer


This exhibition features drawings, sketches, paintings, and prints by Winslow Homer, selected from the Museum's collection. In addition to early works depicting seaside and country life, there are several charcoal sketches of Civil War soldiers in the battlefields, drawn when Homer served as an illustrator for Harper's Weekly.
Winslow Homer, paintings, drawings, sketches, prints, permanent collection, exhibitions

Resorts of the Catskills


An exhibition of the architectural and social history of this New York mountain resort. Photographs, maps, Hudson River School paintings, and historical documents contribute to the depiction of this popular vacation spot from pre-Civil War days to the present time.
New York, resort, photographs, MAPS, paintings, books, exhibitions, ch:exhibition=35350457

The American Landscape


More than 160 selections from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum’s permanent collection of 19th- and 20th-century American landscapes are on view. This exhibition features Hudson River School artists Thomas Cole, Samuel Colman, Frederic Edwin Church, and Daniel Huntington, as well as works by Winslow Homer and others.
American landscape, paintings, Hudson River School, Thomas Cole, Samuel Colman, Frederic Edwin Church, Winslow Homer, Daniel Huntington

Frederic Church, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Moran: Tourism and the American Landscape


Frederic Church, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Moran: Tourism and the American Landscape explores the promotion of scenic tourism in 19th century America through Cooper-Hewitt’s extraordinary collections of oil paintings, drawings, and watercolors by these artists. The exhibition presents the Museum’s American landscape collection at Cooper-Hewitt for the first time in more than 15 years, and is the premiere showing of many of its Homer oil paintings.
Tourism and the American Landscape, Frederic Church, Winslow Homer, Thomas Moran, oil paintings, paintings, drawings, watercolors, exhibitions, 19th century, ch:exhibition=35350755

Scher Abundance


There is a show called MAPS at the Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery exhibiting an abundant selection of cartographic paintings by Paula Scher of Pentagram, including pieces painted between 1998 and 2010. You don’t realize how big these paintings are when you see them online or reproduced as prints—for example, the World Trade map from 2010 is 92” high by 157” wide.
Paula Scher, Pentagram, cartographic, paintings, map, MAPS, big