jewelry

Design by Hand | Heath Ceramics: Clay Bead Design (Teen Workshop)


Explore texture, pattern, and glaze to create ceramic beads at this hands-on workshop for teens led by Heath Ceramics. About the Design by Hand series: Launched in fall 2013 with the iconic Finnish brand Marimekko, the Design by Hand series focuses on the craftsmanship, innovations and merits of contemporary global designers. Special programs connect university students, high school students, adults, and families with design. Image by Jeffery Cross
ceramics, jewelry, design, beads, Heath

Eventbrite - Design by Hand | Heath Ceramics: Clay Bead Design (Teen workshop)

Design by Hand | Heath Ceramics: Clay Bead Design (Adult Workshop)


Explore texture, pattern, and glaze to create ceramic beads at this hands-on workshop for adults led by Heath Ceramics. About the Design by Hand series: Launched in fall 2013 with the iconic Finnish brand Marimekko, the Design by Hand series focuses on the craftsmanship, innovations and merits of contemporary global designers. Special programs connect university students, high school students, adults, and families with design. Image by Jeffery Cross
design, beads, ceramics, pottery, jewelry

Eventbrite - Design by Hand | Heath Ceramics: Clay Bead Design (Adult workshop)

Ingenious Solutions: Irena Brynner's "Wrap Around" Earrings


Born in 1917 in the remote Russian town of Vladivostak, Irena Brynner was raised in a tightly knit two family household. However, the families were dispersed in 1928 due to political upheaval that forced Brynner and her parents to relocate to Manchuria.[1] Brynner left Manchuria to study painting and sculpture in Lausanne, Switzerland but returned to her family in 1939.
Irena Brynner, jewelry, earrigns, gold

Precious Jewelry of Hair: A Brooch and Bracelet Set for Mourning


In the genteel Victorian parlor, fashionable women participated in various leisurely pursuits, like making needlework and playing musical instruments. In what today is a more unusual activity, women transformed the hair of a loved one—either deceased or living—into a picture to be hung on the wall or into a piece of jewelry to be worn. Although hair work in England existed as early as the seventeenth century, it expanded in the nineteenth century as one of the many mourning customs women practiced.
jewelry, hair, mourning, nineteenth century, women, women and design

Members' Tour | David Webb Jewelry


Open to Patron and National Design Council members. Join us for a behind-the-scenes event at David Webb with Sarah Coffin, Curator and Head of Product Design and Decorative Arts, and Ruth Peltason, author of David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler. This rare visit to the jewelry workshop, where all of the goods are made on the premises, offers an appreciation of the technical mastery associated with the making of Webb jewelry. Enjoy a special viewing of the archives, led by Ruth, showcasing original drawings and production records that continue to direct the efforts of David Webb today.
David Webb, jewelry, membership event, membership, member tour

Eventbrite - Members' Tour | David Webb Jewelry

Take a Flying Leap


René Lalique has long been considered the most brilliant and original French Art Nouveau designer of jewelry and glass.  His lifelong study of nature in drawings and photographs including wildflowers and rare floral species, animals and insects such as swans, bats, birds, and dragonflies provided the unusual repertory for his jewelry and accessories.  In place of traditional gemstones, Lalique developed a technique of incorporating non-precious stones including opals with enamel on materials such as ivory and horn that changed the look of nineteenth-century jewelry.
Rene Lalique, Art Nouveau, drawing, jewelry, fish, comb, nature

Festive Foil?


The holiday season brings out the idea at least of festive parties, and, to some, that means putting on fancy clothes and jewelry.  The idea of glittering adornment to dazzle goes back to antiquity and gold has been a constant. However, innovative use of new materials, so popular now, is not new. The choice of materials is ever evolving. 
jewelry, aluminum, gold, Empress Eugenie, Queen Victoria, Crystal Palace, innovation, demi-parure, brooch, earrings

An Egyptian Story, enriched with personal narrative


The holiday season is a special time of year to reflect on family and… jewels! Hemmerle’s Egyptian Story bangle is a particularly exceptional jewel. Not only does it evoke the firm’s distinctive voice, showcasing innovative techniques and material combinations to create a bold, modern jewel enriched with cultural references, but it provides a bit of personal narrative about the fourth-generation family-run atelier.
Hemmerle, jewelry, Egyptian, jewels

Horsehair jewelry


The custom of keeping a locket of hair as a token of love, or as a relic of a holy figure, has existed for centuries. The idea of using hair for the structural part of jewelry became fashionable in the eighteenth century. By the 1830s, especially in England and the United States, all sorts of pendants, brooches, earrings, necklaces, and bracelets were made using human as well as horsehair. Commercial catalogues of the 1850s to 1870s mass-marketed these delicate designs. It is inspiring how a banal material can be reinvented into something precious.
jewelry, horsehair, necklace, bracelet

No Breeze Will Ruffle These Feathers


On first glance, this necklace by the Norwegian jeweler and metalwork artist Tone Vigeland, appears to be a luxurious collar made of delicate, lustrous blue-black feathers. It is actually an intricate tour de force in metals, composed of hundreds of steel nails that Vigeland flattened and forged by hand, then meticulously attached one by one to a silver chainmail backing, and embellished with a ring of gold pod-like beads and a simple rose-colored mother-of-pearl clasp.
Tone Vigeland, Norway, jewelry, nails, gold, mother-of-pearl

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