graphic design

Shocked and Appealed


Well, this is certainly pugnacious—but what propaganda isn’t, really? It takes no learned scholar to discern that this poster means business. Euphemism wasn’t really of interest to the United States in December 1941, when its resistance to entering World War II was abruptly terminated by the infamous events in Pearl Harbor. The nation was catapulted into the global turmoil that had already blurred national boundaries and sent refugees seeking shelter in other countries all over the world.
World War II, propaganda, Cubism, Jean Carlu, posters, graphic design, offset lithography

Down the rabbit hole


In this latest report on your usage of our new online collection, I'm going to look at entry points. One of the main aims of an online collection these days is to move beyond a "view on a database" and deliver some of the affordances of a gallery experience—especially the ability to serendipitously discover new rabbit-holes down which to disappear.
permanent collection, furniture, jewelry, graphic design

A Poster by Michiel Schuurman


Every summer, hundreds of thousands of visitors travel by ferry to Governors Island, a former Coast Guard outpost that has become one of New York City’s most popular public parks. In summer 2012, Cooper-Hewitt was proud to host our exhibition, Graphic Design: Now In Productio​n, on Governors Island, and I was proud to be among the organizing curators.
Michiel Schuurman, Graphic Design: Now in Production, posters, graphic design, 21st century

Abacus


Among the most influential books in the history of American graphic design is Paul Rand’s Thoughts on Design, published in 1947. Covering the jacket of this ground-breaking manifesto of modernist theory and practice is a series of oblong dots arranged in uneven rows, rendered in translucent shades of gray. The image is based on a photogram, made by exposing a wood-and-wire abacus to a sheet of photographic paper. At once abstract and recognizable, the photogram is a direct imprint of a physical object.
textiles, graphic design, abacus, Paul Rand, photogram, L. Anton Maix

Bare is the New Clad


In 1999, Stefen Sagmeister (1962- ), founder of Sagmeister and Walsh Inc., carved text into his own body with an X-Acto knife. His dedication to his projects and his willingness to communicate with the audience are shown in his startling depictions of sexuality, pain, and uncanny humor. By pushing the boundaries of graphic design, he conveys radical yet meaningful messages.
Stefan Sagmeister, Detroit, poster, graphic design, knife, TED Talk, nude, 20th century, AIGA

I Read It in a Magazine


No one can resist flipping through the pages of a magazine—in waiting rooms, while traveling, or anywhere. One that I love to browse through, and one that is popular among our library’s users, is the “women’s magazine,” Modern Priscilla (1887-1930). Originally focused on dress patterns, china painting, and needlework, the magazine’s scope was subsequently enlarged to cover other aspects of women's home life.
magazines, Periodicals, Modern Priscilla, Fortune magazine, Smithsonian Libraries, illustration, graphic design, National Design Library

Designer (Advertised) Jeans


While recent advertising has been overwhelmingly digital, the contemporary graphic designer and former National Design Award winner, Stefan Sagmeister, relishes the opportunity to use his considerable graphic talent and imagination to create posters the traditional way, through photo offset lithography. These posters are deliberately human and personal, in response to the “cold” modernist design of some of his colleagues. In general, Sagmeister searches for ideas that elicit sensual or emotional responses from the viewer.
Sagmeister Inc., Stefan Sagmeister, Levi's, Denim, jeans, thread, clothing, graphic design, Los Angeles, San Francisco, advertising, poster, offset lithography

Fall Exhibition Tour Schedule


Cooper-Hewitt Announces Fall Exhibition Tour Schedule Several exhibitions organized by the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum will be traveling across the country and around the world this fall, including “Romantic Interiors: Watercolours 1820–1890,” “Design with the Other 90%: CITIES” and “Graphic Design—Now in Production.”
exhibitions, graphic design, urban planning, tours, Los Angeles, Portland, Saint Louis, paris, decorative arts

Bandboxes and Shopping Bags in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


Publication design: Lorraine Wild
bandboxes, shopping bags, cardboard, paper, graphic design, ephemera, permanent collection, ch:exhibition=35350095

Blowing in the Mind


Blowing in the Mind/Mister Tambourine Man. Martin Sharp. 1968. Screenprint on copper foil paper, 29 5/16 x 19 3/8 in. Gift of Sara and Marc Benda. 2009-12-25
Martin Sharp, Albrecht Dürer, Bob Dylan, music, wood block prints, screenprint, Australian graphic design, graphic design, knots, Northern Renaissance, Germany, London, Donovan, Jimi Hendrix, Cream, woodcut, human reasoning, sunglasses, portraits
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