furniture

New Material, New Form


This innovative stacking chair is arguably Danish designer Verner Panton’s best known work. While not the first cantilevered chair—Dutch designer Gerrit Rietveld’s 1934 wooden Zig-Zag chair is an earlier example—the Panton chair was the first cantilevered chair made from a single piece of injection-molded plastic. Its fluid organic shape is made to fit the human form.
Verner Panton, Herman Miller, chair, plastic, Denmark, furniture, Pop Culture

A Work By Wendell Castle


This chest, by twentieth-century American designer/craftsman Wendell Castle is an outstanding example of the American studio furniture movement.
chest, stereo cabinet, Wendell Castle, studio craft, furniture, wood, laminated wood, Wharton Esherick, American

Finding animals in furniture


I love to try to “read” an object. Looking at the Elephant Trunk Table (Elefantenruesseltisch in German), it is easy to see why it was so named. What is less clear is why this design came into being. The table’s eight legs, which might suggest an octopus, look like elephant trunks. They also suggest the S-shaped cabriole legs found on tables and chairs starting in the first half of the 18th century, such as in this chair, also part of the Museum's collection:
elephant trunk, table, furniture

American Gothic


This trade catalog, which contains more than 100 photographs of furniture in the “modern" gothic style, is one of the only remaining works to visually document the furniture designed by the renowned New York cabinetmakers, Kimbel & Cabus. Anthony Kimbel emigrated from Germany in the late 1840s and partnered with Anton Bembe to form Bembe and Kimbel in 1854, creating furniture in the Rococo-revival style.
Kimbel & Cabus, furniture, Neo-Gothic, trade catalog, American, National Design Library

Down the rabbit hole


In this latest report on your usage of our new online collection, I'm going to look at entry points. One of the main aims of an online collection these days is to move beyond a "view on a database" and deliver some of the affordances of a gallery experience—especially the ability to serendipitously discover new rabbit-holes down which to disappear.
permanent collection, furniture, jewelry, graphic design

Printing Furniture


“Stereolithography has enabled us to…imagine, on an industrial level, a new freedom of creation, which would notably emancipate us from the limitations of molds.”[1]  Patrick Jouin
Patrick Jouin, C2 Chair, furniture, rapid prototyping, printed furniture, Materialise, Sterolithography, mass customization, Solid Collection

Creative Craft in Denmark Today: An Exhibition of Contemporary Work Organized by the Danish Handcraft Guild


Denmark, Danish, Greenland, handicrafts, artisans, decorative arts, textiles, ceramics, jewelry, furniture, wallcoverings, 20th century

Furniture in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


Publication design: Heidi Humphrey
furniture design, furniture, craftsmanship, permanent collection, ch:exhibition=35349929

Cooper-Hewitt: Fashioning Felt


Fashioning Felt on view Mar 6 through Sept 7, 2009 at Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. This exhibition explores the varied new uses of felt in a range of fields, including product design, fashion, architecture, and home furnishings.
Fashioning Felt, Exhibition, felt, fiber, friction, fashion, product, furniture, wool

Cooper-Hewitt: Unity of Opposites: A Conversation with Doshi-Levien


Join London-based design duo Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien in a conversation about their new furniture collection for Moroso that combines handmade and industrial production, a design approach that reflects a cross-cultural creative process. The discussion is moderated by Julie Lasky, Editor-In-Chief of I.D. Magazine.
Unity of Opposites, Nipa Doshi, Jonathan Levien, Doshi Levien, Designer, London, Industrial Design, industrial production, handmade, furniture, Moroso, cross-cultural, Julie Lasky, I.D. Magazine, Matilda McQuaid, talk, long, public program

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