domestic life

Electrification for a Better Biscuit


By the 1930s, the vast majority of American urban dwellers had access to electricity in their homes and businesses.  But those in impoverished rural areas were often not serviced by private electric companies, who believed that it was not cost-effective for them to invest in extending power lines into areas of the country that would generate only a handful of new customers.
Lester Beall, poster, graphic design, electricity, advertising, cooking, domestic life, dots, screenprint, patriotism, New Deal

Cooper-Hewitt: House Proud - Revealing Interiors


As documents of domestic life, the watercolors featured in House Proud celebrate nineteenth-century interiors and the designers that conceived of them. Cooper-Hewitt invites contemporary designers Hermes Mallea, Carey Maloney, Mitchell Owen, and Thomas Jayne to join exhibition curator Gail Davidson for a roundtable discussion on residential interior design, historic restorations, design promotion, and the role of the interior space as a source of pride, convenience, personal status, and presentation then and now. Participants Hermes Mallea, M (Group) Carey Maloney, M (Group)
House Proud, Exhibition, interiors, 19th century, watercolors, Thaw Collection, Hermes Mallea, Carey Maloney, Mitchell Owen, Thomas Jayne, Designer, gail davidson, curator, residential interior design, historic renovation, design promotion, interior space, domestic life, panel, talk, long, public program

Now I Lay Me Down to Eat: A Salute to the Unknown Art of Living


This exhibition is an exercise in observation, exploring attitudes toward everyday domestic manners by filling the museum with familiar objects relating to such subjects as bathing, sitting, sleeping, eating, and cleansing. Settings from The Last Supper to Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion bathroom are explored. Organized by Bernard Rudofsky, the Museum's scholar-in-residence.
domestic life, exhibitions