Architecture

Searching for Perfection


Richard Meier’s Getty Center, which sits atop a hill in Santa Monica, is, arguably, the last great building of the 20th century. While some liken the complex to a fortified Tuscan hill town, and Meier himself says that he was thinking of Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli or the Villa Farnese in Caprarola, it reminds me of another ancient hilltop complex, the Parthenon.
Richard Meier, J. Paul Getty Center, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Hadrian, Tivoli, Villa Farnese, Caprarola, Parthenon, Athens, Le Corbusier, Architecture, San Diego Freeway, stone, GRiD, Getty Research Institute, construction, drawing

Gertrude Stein's Brother Collects Architecture


Among the most important 20th-century architectural drawings in Cooper-Hewitt’s collection, this work presents four sketches for a suburban Paris two-family villa, commissioned by the modern art collectors, Michael and Sarah Stein (brother and sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein), and their close friend Gabrielle de Monzie. While De Monzie wasn’t especially interested in architecture, she still paid for Michael Stein’s experimental adventure in an avant-garde home.
Villa Stein-de Monzie, Gabrielle de Monzie, Michael Stein, Sarah Stein, Gertrude Stein, Pavilion de l’Esprit Nouveau, 1925 Paris Exposition, Le Corbusier, Architecture, Museum of Modern Art, Calvin S. Hathaway, The Cooper Union Museum for the Arts of Decoration, La Terraces, elevations, drawings, paris

Le Corbusier's Walls


Although he was also a designer, painter and writer, Le Corbusier is known primarily as an architect. And, like many prominent early 20th-century architects, Le Corbusier believed in the importance of a completely designed environment. His first collection of wallpapers, designed in 1931, consisted mainly of solid colors that he referred to as a color keyboard.
wallpaper, Le Corbusier, Salubra, Architecture, interior design

The Architect's Eye


The Cooper Union Museum Chronicle, Volume 3, No. 4
Architecture, drawings, architectural drawings, permanent collection

Summary Catalogue of Drawings by Identified Italian Architects in the Cooper Union Museum


Architecture, drawings, architectural drawings, Italian, Italy, scenic design, permanent collection

Columns in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


columns, Architecture, drawings, prints, decorative arts, permanent collection, ch:exhibition=35350415

Architectural Drawings in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


Publication design: Sue Koch
Architecture, drawings, architectural drawings, permanent collection

Theater Designs in the Collection of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum


Publication design: H+
theater, theatrical design, drawings, Architecture, architectural drawings, costumes, permanent collection

National Design Triennial: Why Design Now?


Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum presents the fourth exhibition in the National Design Triennial series. Why Design Now? explores the work of designers addressing human and environmental problems across many fields of design, from architecture and product design to fashion, graphics, new media and landscape design.
national design triennial, why design now?, Ellen Lupton, Cara McCarty, Matilda McQuaid, Cynthia Smith, global, Architecture, product design, fashion design, graphic design, new media, landscape design, exhibitions, ch:exhibition=35350969

Why Design Now?: Norwegian National Opera and Ballet


Why? The first purpose-built home of the Norwegian Opera and Ballet is both a bridge and anchor for the Oslo community. As part of the first phase of an extensive transformation of the waterfront, the Opera is a monumental gateway to the harbor. Its most distinctive feature is a white marble roof that serves as a public plaza on which visitors can experience the building without going inside.
Norwegian Opera house, Oslo, Norway, monument, Architecture, building, theater, marble, Why Design Now, Exhibition

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