Architecture

Platform of Hope (Ashar Macha)_CITIES exhibition


2010. Editor: Quamrul Hasan. Courtesy of Quamrul Hasan. Dhaka is projected to become the second largest city in the world by 2015. The Platform of Hope stands in stark contrast to the constant threat of eviction faced by Korail residents, and reflects their desire and ability to improve their dense settlement.
Bangladesh, Dhaka, Architecture, landscape

Cooper-Hewitt: Medellín- Design Transformation


Join us for a unique discussion of Medellín, Columbia's transformation from one of the most violent cities in the world to a vital community whose new architecture carries the powerful message of social and educational inclusion.
Urban Design, Medellin, Architecture, presentations

Stairway to Modernism: Thérèse Bonney Collection


Upon first glance it is difficult to tell if we are looking up or down this spiral staircase.  Clean lines intersect with natural light, casting shadows that create a deceptive flattening effect from this vantage point. What appear to be stairs descending counterclockwise with no railing is actually the underside of the staircase designed to mimic the stairs above.   
Art Deco, modernism, Robert Mallet-Stevens, paris, Architecture, staircase, photograph

An elegant form of air purification


The ProSolve 370e system consists of modular architectural tiles coated with titanium dioxide that, when activated by daylight, neutralizes nitrogen oxides—harmful for their effect on the respiratory system, acid rain, and ozone depletion—in the surrounding environment. While the antimicrobial and air-purifying effects of titanium dioxide have been known for years, it is the form and application of ProSolve that is particularly innovative.
Elegant Embellishments, sustainability, Architecture, air purification, national design triennial

Design Talks: Mack Scogin Merrill Elam


National Design Award winners Mack Scogin and Merrill Elam have worked together in architecture for over forty years. Founded in 1984, their Atlanta-based firm, Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects, has won international acclaim for work that ranges from a sleek factory for Herman Miller to the Lulu Chow Wang Campus Center for Wellesley College and commercial office space for Tishman Speyer Properties. The firm's diverse body of work is uniquely characterized by profound rigor tempered by childlike innocence.
Architecture, nda, 2013, 2012, design talks, Adobe, collaboration

From Frivolity to Revolt: The Hôtel de Salm’s Role in the French Revolution


Jean-Guillaume Moitte, Henri Auguste, Thomas Jefferson, Hôtel de Salm, Architecture, satyrs, neo-classicism

Design and Social Impact Q + A: Bryan Bell


Five Intelligent Coalitions: Design and Social Impact panelists were invited to expand on the Design and Social Impact white paper recommendations. Each had participated in the 2012 Social Impact Design Summit, which the “Design and Social Impact: A cross-sectoral agenda for design education, research and practice” white paper chronicles.
socially responsible design, social impact design, SEED network, Architecture
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The George Washington Monuments


By the time of his death in 1799, George Washington had become one of America’s first national heroes. This drawing is an example of one way the American public coped with the first President’s death: through mourning pictures.
George Washington, monuments, mourning pictures, English decorative arts, Potomac River, Mount Vernon, President, America, tombs, drawing, Architecture

Nothing to Prouvé


Born on today’s date in 1901, Jean Prouvé was among the most well-known French designers and architects of the mid-twentieth century. He was the son of Victor Prouvé, one of the founders of l’Ecole de Nancy—an Art Nouveau artist collective. This early exposure instilled in Prouvé the idea that art and industry were inherently linked, a concept he sought to express throughout his career.
Jean Prouvé, Victor Prouvé, L’Ecole de Nancy, Art Nouveau, Siegfried Odermatt, Museum für Gestaltung, Erasmus University, prefabrication, industrial materials, Architecture, Rosmarie Tissi, Dutch graphic design, graphic design, poster, offset lithography

William Lescaze's Townhouse Blueprint: Creating a New Look for New York Residences


This blueprint in the Cooper-Hewitt collection depicts architect William Lescaze's radical and trendsetting four-story townhouse at 211 East 48th Street, New York. Little, if any, changes were made between this design—or between a sketch, also in the museum's collection—and the final structure, built in 1933–34.
William Lescaze, New York City, townhouse, Architecture, blueprint, drawing, Matthew Baird

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