women

Crossed Wires: The Gendered Technology of the Princess Phone


The ubiquity of smart phones today makes it almost impossible to imagine a time when there were not many choices when purchasing a telephone, and they were not customizable, let alone portable. This began to change in 1959 when Bell Telephone Systems released the Princess telephone as the first phone specifically created for teenage girls and women. The Princess phone began a trend of using the telephone itself as a form of expression by taking a previously neutral communication device and transforming it into a gendered object.
Telephone, Henry Dreyfuss, Bell Telephone, women, teenagers, Industrial Design

Precious Jewelry of Hair: A Brooch and Bracelet Set for Mourning


In the genteel Victorian parlor, fashionable women participated in various leisurely pursuits, like making needlework and playing musical instruments. In what today is a more unusual activity, women transformed the hair of a loved one—either deceased or living—into a picture to be hung on the wall or into a piece of jewelry to be worn. Although hair work in England existed as early as the seventeenth century, it expanded in the nineteenth century as one of the many mourning customs women practiced.
jewelry, hair, mourning, nineteenth century, women, women and design

A Soviet Achievement


This large hand-painted circular plate, measuring 13 9/16” in diameter, represents a period of Russian history during Stalin’s regime, where state sponsored porcelain products were used to promote the accomplishments of Russian society and culture and helped to play an important role in the official Party’s Soviet state propaganda campaign.
Plate, Porcelain, women, sports, Russia, Soviet Union, propaganda

Grasset's Nymph


Graceful, swirling arcs envelop a golden-skinned, blue-coiffed woman.  Her eyes flicker back while her arm reaches forward, as if she is swimming away into the gilt turquoise surf intertwined with her cobalt locks.  Is she swimming amongst peaceful waves or against a looming kelp forest of her own serpentine locks?
Eugène-Samuel Grasset, Art Nouveau, jewelry design, drawing, hair, women

Newcomb Pottery: An Enterprise for Southern Women, 1895-1940


This exhibition traces the history of the ceramics produced by Newcomb College, in New Orleans, where young Southern women were trained for the art industry as professional artisans. More than 200 examples of Newcomb Pottery are on view. 
ceramics, pottery, American, New Orleans, women, Arts and Crafts, traveling exhibitions

Mechanical Brides: Women and Machines from Home to Office


This exhibition takes a critical look at the household and office objects marketed to and used by women, including telephones, typewriters, desks, washing machines, vacuums, and irons are displayed. Oral histories, advertisements, photographs, and film stills contribute to the narrative.
women, housewares, Industrial Design, product design, consumerism, advertising, exhibitions, ch:exhibition=35350043

Made by Hand: Alabama Chanin


The evening of May 19th capped off a three-day residency at the Cooper-Hewitt for Natalie Chanin, founder and designer of the design studio Alabama Chanin. Chanin, one of the founders of the burgeoning “slow fashion” movement, followed up her two-day Design Directions workshop for teenagers with an hour-long public lecture and book signing. 
Natalie Chanin, Alabama Chanin, design studio, slow fashion, fashion design, Design directions, workshops, Teens, book signing, manufacturing, processes, North Carolina, environmental design, industrial, textiles, Bauhaus, India, t-shirt, tee shirt, sourcing, Alabama, quilting, tradition, Department of Labor, investigation, business model, cottage industry, quality standards, handmade, Alabama Studio Style, Alabama Stitch, book, open source, open-source, DIY, patterns, sustainable, ecological, cotton, organic, waste, south, Tennessee, Mississippi, rural, Preservation, sewing, knit, dye, thread, zero waste, women

Felt in Haiti


I had the pleasure of meeting recently with Ton Vriens, a Dutch documentary filmmaker and journalist who, through his foundation Turtle Tree, is working with women in Haiti to develop a felt-making co-operative, with the goal of achieving economic and social independence for the members of the self-governed group.
Haiti, felt, collective, women, Tom Vriens, Dutch, documentary, filmmaker, journalist, Turtle Tree, foundation, economic, social, independence, poverty, Fanm Veret Wi Nou Kapab!, Women of Verrettes Yes We Can Do It, grant, Andalusia, spain, Business, training, product development, American, makers, workshops, needlework, organic, wool, source, soft, import, equipment, iPhone, iPod, laptop, covers

Slideshow: Miss Rococo


Intimate and ornate, rococo design has long been associated with feminine taste. Madame de Pompadour, the official mistress of Louis XV, was one of the supreme patrons of the rococo style. In 1990 artist Cindy Sherman pictured herself as Madame de Pompadour, emblazoning her image on a porcelain tureen commissioned by Artes Magnus.
rococo, Madame de Pompadour, Louis XV, mistress, patron, Cindy Sherman, image, tureen, Artes Magnus, curvaceous, female, François Boucher, Alphonse Mucha, opportunity, create, domestic sphere, handicrafts, Rococo: The Continuing Curve, Exhibition, women, creators, sensual, organic, sinuous, slides