weaving

Turbo


Jorge Lizarazo is the owner and founder of Hechizoo, a textile firm based in Colombia. Lizarazo originally worked as an architect, which has influenced his textiles in terms of structural clarity and use of materials. His designs also benefit from his staff, who bring with them an expertise in the rich weaving traditions of their region. He trains his staff to work with new and unusual materials that complement the often understated and basic textile structure.
Hechizoo, Colombia, tradition, weaving

A continued tradition


This dress, woven by Lydia Novillo in a women’s cooperative in Formosa, Argentina, illustrates the continuation of an important South American textile tradition through a contemporary lens. The tradition stems from the weaving practices of the indigenous people of South America, the Wichi, who live primarily in Formosa, an isolated area in northern Argentina. Originally settling near the Bermejo and Pilcomayo Rivers, they were semi-nomadic, agricultural people who also relied on fishing during the dry season. For centuries they have used the fibers of the chaguar, from the bromeliad family, to weave fishing nets, bags, and other objects, which continue to sustain many of the communities today.
dress, South America, tradition, Lydia Novillo, chaguar, Argentina, weaving, crochet

Made in the USA


Felt Lace X-Change was designed by Paula Verbeek-Cowart in 2008, and was woven by Oriole Mill, founded by Bethanne Knudson and Stephan Michelson in Hendersonville, North Carolina in 2006. The mill offers custom woven and designed textiles, focusing on quality, rather than quantity and speed, in the production process. They are dedicated to making the finest jacquard and dobby fabrics from natural fibers and ultimately hope to lead a resurgence of small artisanal mills in this once vibrant textile-making area of the country. One of the outcomes of opening the mill has been the formation of Studio Structure by Knudson and Pauline Verbeek-Cowart. Felt Lace X-Change reflects the mission of the mill in its craftsmanship and experimentation with natural fibers and also demonstrates Verbeek-Cowart’s interest in exploring the ways in which wool can be transformed.
Paula Verbeek-Cowart, Oriole Mill, North Carolina, weaving

Color in Combination


Weaver and textile designer Dorothy Liebes had twin obsessions: texture and color, both exemplified by this sample from the museum’s collection.
Dorothy Liebes, weaving, Color, texture

Andean woman’s mantle


This beautiful cloth is a woman’s shoulder mantle, called a lliclla in the Quechua language of the Inca Empire, and was made during the colonial period of Peru. A perfect blend of the cross-cultural elements of the 16th- and 17th-century era of global trade, the Chinese silk and Spanish silver threads are woven with Inca techniques and design motifs.
textiles, woven, weaving, thread, Peru, Inca, Andes

Enhancing the View


Weaver and designer Dorothy Liebes owed much of her success to her ability to create textiles that complemented and enhanced mid-century modern architecture. Using windows to bring the outside in was an integral part of the period's new design for living. Multiple large windows became a standard feature in new homes, often replacing fireplaces as the focal point of the main room. 
Dorothy Liebes, weaving, modern architecture, window treatments, interiors, textiles

Beautiful Ladies


Admirers of this exquisite tapestry fragment woven in medieval Spain fondly refer to it as "the Drinking Ladies"—an apt description for the two pairs of beautifully-robed women who lift their cups and bottle in salutation. The Drinking Ladies communicates the pleasures of female companionship amid the sumptuous environment of the wealthier classes. This was the time when the Alhambra was in its greatest splendor, with every surface of the royal residence covered in elaborate decoration.
tapestry, slit tapestry, Anni Albers, textiles, weaving, spain, Alhambra, Bauhaus

The Jacquard Loom: Recent Experiments


On display are original Jacquard fabrics woven by 17 contemporary textile artists at the Rhode Island School of Design—the only school in the United States to own a jacquard loom. 
textiles, fabrics, weaving, 20th century, traveling exhibitions

Damask


The exhibition presents damask weaves in silk, linen, and wool from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum’s collection. Among the objects on view are a 14th-century Chinese satin damask, 16th–19th-century traditional European patterns woven on different types of looms, and a linen napkin made for Napoleon I.
textiles, weaving, fabrics, permanent collection, exhibitions, ch:exhibition=35350015

Color by the Yard: Printed Fabrics from 1760 - 1860


This exhibition explores the development of printed cotton textiles and weaving technology. Two hundred objects are on display, including textiles and original wood blocks, printers's sample books, and costumes made of printed fabrics.  
ch:exhibition=35349321, textile printing, 18th century, 19th century, weaving

Pages