textile

Bluette by Atelier Martine


Bluette is a textile by an unknown designer made in the design school Atelier Martine. The school was founded by Paul Poiret (1879 – 1944), a celebrated Parisian couturier known for exotic fashions inspired by the Middle East and Asia. Named for his daughter, Atelier Martine embraced the notion of an unstudied, instinctive creativity. Poiret opened Atelier Martine in 1912 following a European tour where he was greatly impressed by the printed textiles of the Wiener Werkstätte of Vienna.
textile, Atelier Martine, Paul Poiret, Wiener Werkstätte, Louis Rorimer, flowers

Longevity


Asia Week  is in full swing! An annual event in New York City, Asia Week began last Friday, March 15th and runs through this Saturday, March 23rd . In an effort to support and celebrate Asian art both in the city and across the nation, galleries, auction houses, museums and cultural institutions in New York  host sales, exhibitions, lectures and other special events.
China, rank badge, crane, textile, Asia

A Mantle Fragment


Moving to a new home includes a trip to the nearest library to read all about this new location. Next, after finding a great librarian, is being lucky enough to find a neighbor who becomes a soul mate. My new neighbor in Woodmere, New York shared my love and enthusiasm for archeology and anthropology, an interest I have had ever since my student days in South Africa when I visited the caves at Sterkfontein, outside of Johannesburg.
Peru, textile, mantle

Waste Not


Resourcefulness has been a key component of Japanese life for centuries, and in design, one sees this most dramatically with materials and objects being repurposed, recycled, or reused.  The Japanese textile company, Nuno, founded in 1984, is constantly striving to integrate this ecological approach while continuing to create some of the most technologically innovative and beautiful contemporary textiles anywhere in the world.
Nuno, textile, silk, kibiso, Reiko Sudo

Velvet with Gold Disks


This sumptuous red velvet with gold disks embodies what we can learn from textiles by looking, comparing, deconstructing, reconstructing, and then interpreting our observations.  Milton Sonday, my predecessor in the Textiles department at the Cooper-Hewitt, is a master of this methodology and has spent years employing it and teaching it to researchers and curators around the world.
textile, velvet, gold, Milton Sonday

It's all in the fist...


Make a fist. Pound your hand. Chances are, this was how the paisley pattern started—according to Indian textile designer Umang Hutheesing, who happens to know a lot about the history of Indian textiles. On a recent visit to New York City, I asked Hutheesing for his opinion on the derivation of the paisley pattern. The most popular story says that the form is derived from the shoot of a date palm, which symbolizes the tree of life.
paisley, Maharam, textile

Jacquard Weave X-Change


After putting the textile into proper archival storage, I promptly forgot about it as I went about doing the rest of my work. That is, until I had the fortune to bump into a woman named Bethanne Knudson at a Brooklyn dinner party a few weeks ago. 
Jacquard, weave, textile, cloth, Open, panels, Pauline Verbeek-Cowart, studio, Studio Structure, Oriole Mill, Felt Lace X-Change, Jacquard Center, Bethanne Knudson, conductive, weaving, mill, training, fabric, niche, high end

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