spain

A Maternal Touch for Refugees


At the beginning of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the population of refugees increased rapidly. Among them were thousands of children who had evacuated to other European countries, such as the USSR and France, however, many stayed under the support of the Republican government of Spain. By 1937, government- funded housing welcomed refugee and orphaned communities. This poster most likely recognizes the Republic’s effort to promote residential support for children throughout the war.
poster, Spanish Civil War, Propoganda, spain, lithograph, Children, family, maternal, nurturing, refugee

Exercising Their Rights


Propaganda posters are among the most important documents remaining from the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). These posters are vivid testimonies depicting the social and political landscape that endured throughout Spain’s unrest.  Propaganda was seen on almost every building, disseminating messages against Fascism, military recruitment, and even the emancipation of women. These social agendas represented new realities for Spain, especially in the communication between men and women.
Propoganda, poster, graphic design, feminism, spain, Spanish Civil War, athletics, camp, Fascusm, emancipation

A Spanish Knitted Cap


That knitted caps enjoyed great popularity in eighteenth-century Spain can be seen in the many extent examples located in museums in the United States and Europe. Cooper-Hewitt has a very fine cap that was acquired in 1951 as a gift from the generous donor, Richard C. Greenleaf. Knitted in dark red silk, the cap is primarily patterned with diagonal ribs while the very top has a geometric arrangement of diamond-shapes and triangles.
cap, knit, spain, Greenleaf

Beautiful Ladies


Admirers of this exquisite tapestry fragment woven in medieval Spain fondly refer to it as "the Drinking Ladies"—an apt description for the two pairs of beautifully-robed women who lift their cups and bottle in salutation. The Drinking Ladies communicates the pleasures of female companionship amid the sumptuous environment of the wealthier classes. This was the time when the Alhambra was in its greatest splendor, with every surface of the royal residence covered in elaborate decoration.
tapestry, slit tapestry, Anni Albers, textiles, weaving, spain, Alhambra, Bauhaus

A Gift of Gloves


For centuries, European rules of etiquette allowed a woman to receive gloves as a gift from men other than her husband. The practice was so widespread that novelty became an important consideration for the gift-giver when making his selection. Light-colored printed gloves enjoyed popularity with women in early 19th-century Europe, but this pair’s eye-catching design is particularly noteworthy for its unusual optic effect.
gloves, spain, leatherwork, intaglio, 19th century, hand-made, craftsmanship

Tiles


This exhibition showcases tiles from the 13th through the 20th century, from a variety of countries and cultures including Persia, Islamic Spain, and the Netherlands. The majority of tiles are from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum’s permanent ceramic collection, with a portion of the objects on loan from other private and public collections. Many tiles will be displayed to the public for the first time.
tiles, ceramics, patterns, exhibitions, spain, Netherlands, Persia

The Catalan Spirit: Gaudí and His Contemporaries


Works by Antoni Gaudí i Cornet and his contemporaries in the Catalan Modernisme movement are on display. In addition to Gaudí, the group included Elies Josep Puig i Cadafalch, Lluís Domènech i Montaner, and Camil Oliveras i Gensana. The exhibition, which focuses the period between 1880 and 1920, includes drawings, furniture, tiles, metalwork, and glass, and features Gaudí's Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Familia and Domènech's Palace of Catalan Music.
Antoni Gaudí i Cornet, spain, Barcelona, Catalan, Architecture, drawings, furniture, tiles, metalwork, Glass, exhibitions

Meier 75


Personally, I am partial to Richard Meier’s approach to architecture. According to Meier, a building is an act of “willful artificiality;” a “man-made” spatial construct that functions as a receptacle for experiencing the world of nature. 
Richard Meier, Architecture, artificiality, man-made, white walls, nature, Frank Lloyd Wright, influences, building, natural, landscape, stage, Display, separation, art, modernist, Le Corbusier, machine, silversmith, Jean Puiforcat, theory, unity, harmony, Modular, system, scale, proportions, drawings, lines, Getty Center, Los Angeles, gift, collection, contemporary, Tod Williams Billie Tsien, Museum of American Folk Art, Alvaro Siza, Galician Center of Contemporary Art, Santiago de Compostela, spain, sketches, museum

Felt in Haiti


I had the pleasure of meeting recently with Ton Vriens, a Dutch documentary filmmaker and journalist who, through his foundation Turtle Tree, is working with women in Haiti to develop a felt-making co-operative, with the goal of achieving economic and social independence for the members of the self-governed group.
Haiti, felt, collective, women, Tom Vriens, Dutch, documentary, filmmaker, journalist, Turtle Tree, foundation, economic, social, independence, poverty, Fanm Veret Wi Nou Kapab!, Women of Verrettes Yes We Can Do It, grant, Andalusia, spain, Business, training, product development, American, makers, workshops, needlework, organic, wool, source, soft, import, equipment, iPhone, iPod, laptop, covers