poster

Visual Verbal Wit


The ITF Internationale Tentoonstelling op Filmgebied (International film exhibition) poster is an unusual advertisement. The subject of the poster - an educational exhibition on the history of film, new technologies, screening (all film types including the avant-garde) and all other facets to the world of film – is reflected in the poster’s execution.
Piet Zwart, poster, graphic design, film, typography

Pushing Beyond the Frame


This poster, entitled Big Nudes, was originally displayed in 1967 at the School of Visual Arts Gallery in Gramercy to announce an exhibition of large nude paintings. This poster is the work of American graphic designer and illustrator Milton Glaser. Glaser has designed more than 400 posters, record-covers, illustrations, magazine covers and advertisements throughout his prolific and diverse career.
Milton Glaser, graphic design, poster, advertising, Exhibition, nude, offset lithography

Baby, It's Cold Outside!


With the temperature outside at record lows this week, I can’t help but think of William Henry Bradley’s The Blue Lady.  Clutching her ice skates in her left hand, she makes a cold winter’s stroll through the thin, bare trees look elegant and placid.  (It is a sad contrast to the bundle of blue layers I’ve been hunkered down in as I head for the subway).
William Henry Bradley, Winter, poster, The Chap-Book, illustration, magazine, graphic design, Art Nouveau, blue, cold, lithography, Edward McKnight Kauffer, advertising, California, American Airlines

Electrification for a Better Biscuit


By the 1930s, the vast majority of American urban dwellers had access to electricity in their homes and businesses.  But those in impoverished rural areas were often not serviced by private electric companies, who believed that it was not cost-effective for them to invest in extending power lines into areas of the country that would generate only a handful of new customers.
Lester Beall, poster, graphic design, electricity, advertising, cooking, domestic life, dots, screenprint, patriotism, New Deal

Fashions in Flight


The Object of the Day for October 3, 2013 featured one of the last posters the celebrated poster artist E. McKnight Kauffer produced in England. After experiencing 25 years of commercial success as a graphic designer, the outbreak of World War II meant that commissioned work dried up and, as an American citizen, he was forced to return to his native country.
Edward McKnight Kauffer, graphic design, poster, fashion, Portrait

Psychedlic Promotion


The Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco was “ground zero” for the counterculture revolution of the 1960s. The so-called psychedelic subculture that emerged in the Haight explored new possibilities in art and living that stemmed from a desire to remake American culture. The artistic endeavors of this community, be it poetry, theater, dance or music, were expressed in weekly “concerts” held in two primary venues.
Lee Conklin, psychedlic, poster, graphic design, advertising, concert poster, Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco, offset lithography

A Mystical Advertisment


Tadanori Yokoo’s designs are the result of an effortless combination of eclectic visual motifs from across time and borders. In this poster for Kanox, a Japanese production company involved with television, film radio, stage and commercial advertising, Yokoo juxtaposes classical architecture from an Italian Renaissance villa with a surrealist galaxy filled with brightly colored celestial bodies. Though the poster’s subject doesn’t immediately seem relevant to the business of production, the composition alludes to the innovative and inventive nature of Kanox.
Tadanori Yokoo, poster, graphic design, offset lithography, advertising

The British Are Coming to the Summer of Love


June of 1967 marked the beginning of the Summer of Love in San Francisco.  The city’s psychedelic scene was in full force and created a zeitgeist of music, art and attitude that’s been fabled in the American patchwork.  This aesthetic had its greatest reach through the stylized concert posters commissioned by the legendary promoter Bill Graham for his shows at the Fillmore Auditorium.
Bonnie MacLean, Bill Graham, Fillmore Auditorium, poster, graphic design, psychedelic, concert poster, music

Inspired By and Designed for New York City Ballet


Edward Gorey, an author and illustrator known for his macabre stories was very passionate about ballet. One of his most well-known books is The Gilded Bat, the story of how Maudie, a girl given to staring at dead birds, is transformed into Mirelle, a chic and mysterious prima ballerina. The woeful tale chronicles her journey from fame to dreadful demise, and in typical Gorey style, mixes in humor by including ballet puns and jokes.
Edward Gorey, illustrator, ballet, New York, New York City Ballet, poster, lithograph

Sustainability, from a National Design Award winner


Paula Scher—the 2013 National Design Award winner for Communication Design—along with Marion Bantjes and Christopher Niemann have produced the first three in a series of twelve posters promoting the concept of Sustainability. The series, commissioned and art directed by William Drenttel and Jessica Helfand of Winterhouse Publications, features the interpretation of sustainability into conceptual graphic design.
sustainability, poster, Paula Scher, National Design Awards, Jessica Helfand, William Drenttel

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