New Yorker

All The World's A Fair


When F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby in 1925, the Valley of Ashes he described as “fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens,” was a very real place. This wasteland between Brooklyn and Queens was known as the Corona Dump, where the Brooklyn Ash Removal Company disposed of the vast quantities of coal burned in New York furnaces. It may be hard to imagine, but the bright and beautiful scene gracing the cover of this issue of the New Yorker from 1939 is the very same place!  
Ilonka Karasz, New Yorker, magazine, illustration, New York, world's fair, party, Robert Moses, F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Washington

Nothing's Flocking


Christina Malman was born in Southhampton, England in 1912. When she was two year’s old she moved to New York City, where she lived and worked for the rest of her life. Christina began her career as a cover artist for the “New Yorker” magazine in the mid 1930’s. Over the course of twenty years, she designed numerous covers, 34 of which were actually published by the New Yorker.  She also drew more than 500 "spot" illustrations, many of which were used in the “Goings on About Town” section of the magazine.
New Yorker, magazine cover, Audobon, bird watching, satire