lithography

Baby, It's Cold Outside!


With the temperature outside at record lows this week, I can’t help but think of William Henry Bradley’s The Blue Lady.  Clutching her ice skates in her left hand, she makes a cold winter’s stroll through the thin, bare trees look elegant and placid.  (It is a sad contrast to the bundle of blue layers I’ve been hunkered down in as I head for the subway).
William Henry Bradley, Winter, poster, The Chap-Book, illustration, magazine, graphic design, Art Nouveau, blue, cold, lithography, Edward McKnight Kauffer, advertising, California, American Airlines

Odalisque Reconsidered


Tadanori Yokoo is a celebrated Japanese artist for his work in graphic design. Yokoo’s posters constitute a unique style of graphic design that is firmly rooted in Japanese tradition while incorporating Western elements that speak to the increasing globalization of Japanese society in the 1960s and 70s.
Tadanori Yokoo, poster, Japan, graphic design, ukiyo-e, lithography, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, cosmetics

Good Vibrations


Stare into the electric blue shades of this woman’s sunglasses and what do you see?  Even if you know what you are looking for, the blue letterforms come together to form coherent words only with sustained visual focus.  If you were to advertise a concert that you wanted people to come to, would you make it this difficult for your audience to find out about it?  Or could it be that the designer had something else in mind?
Victor Moscoso, San Francisco, The Chambers Brothers, Josef Albers, Herbert Matter, Yale University, Cooper Union, color theory, New York, poster, lithography, Neon Rose, Wes Wilson, Stanley Mouse, Rick Griffin, typography, graphic design

Wide-eyed Printmaking


Beginning in the late 19th century, the medium of printmaking played an integral role in the creation of modern Mexican art, a tradition that can be traced back to the work of, among others, José Guadalupe Posada.  But it was in the post-revolutionary period of the early 20th century that large groups of Mexican artists, often with the support of the government, began using printmaking as a means of expression that allowed for large-scale dissemination.
Francisco Dosamantes, Mexico, printmaking, lithography, posters, Taller de Gráfica Popular, José Guadalupe Posada, Emilio Amero