lithograph

A Maternal Touch for Refugees


At the beginning of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the population of refugees increased rapidly. Among them were thousands of children who had evacuated to other European countries, such as the USSR and France, however, many stayed under the support of the Republican government of Spain. By 1937, government- funded housing welcomed refugee and orphaned communities. This poster most likely recognizes the Republic’s effort to promote residential support for children throughout the war.
poster, Spanish Civil War, Propoganda, spain, lithograph, Children, family, maternal, nurturing, refugee

The Theater. Very Parco.


Eiko Ishioka was a prolific and revolutionary designer. She contributed enormously to the fields of art direction, graphic design, production, as well as costume design for film, theater and opera. Based in part on her innovative work for the Japanese cosmetic manufacturing company, Shiseido, Ishioka was hired as the chief art director for a new breed of Japanese department store called Parco. The establishment was centered on the philosophy that the Japanese youth needed a platform to establish their identity in connection with the rest of the world, particularly the West.
poster, graphic design, Japan, lithograph, Eiko Ishioka, Parco, shopping, theater, advertising

Inspired By and Designed for New York City Ballet


Edward Gorey, an author and illustrator known for his macabre stories was very passionate about ballet. One of his most well-known books is The Gilded Bat, the story of how Maudie, a girl given to staring at dead birds, is transformed into Mirelle, a chic and mysterious prima ballerina. The woeful tale chronicles her journey from fame to dreadful demise, and in typical Gorey style, mixes in humor by including ballet puns and jokes.
Edward Gorey, illustrator, ballet, New York, New York City Ballet, poster, lithograph

Harmonious Line


With its sinuous curving line, asymmetrical composition, and integration of colors, forms, and lettering, this poster by the Belgian industrial designer, Hendrikus Van de Velde, ranks among the icons of the Art Nouveau movement.  In 1898, the General Manager of the Tropon firm, manufacturers of a health supplement developed from egg whites, commissioned Van de Velde to design posters, packaging and other graphic design pieces for the company.  Rather than illustrate people consuming the food additive, Van de Velde enticed viewers’ attention by showing egg whites separating f
Hendrikus Van de Velde, poster, lithograph, Art Nouveau, Belgium

Kindergarten Cut-Outs


The Schmitz-Horning Company was founded in Cleveland, Ohio in 1905 and was known for its lithographed borders and scenic wallpapers. One of its early papers was “Kindergarten Cut-Outs,” the first interactive wallpaper designed for children. These papers were sold as five-foot long panels at a cost of one dollar per panel. The paper in the Museum’s collection is not a full panel­—as you can see, the cat has been cut in half.
wallpaper, nursery, dog, rabbit, animals, lithograph, Schmitz-Horning Company