Jean Carlu

Montana


Throughout the 1940s, the graphic designer E. McKnight Kauffer created numerous book jackets for Harcourt Brace, Alfred Knopf and others as well as his illustrated version of The Complete Poems and Stories of Edgar Allan Poe which was published in 1946. In the same year he received a commission from the Container Corporation of America to produce a magazine advertisement for the ‘United States’ series – in which all forty-eight states were represented.
E. McKnight Kauffer, Montana, graphic design, advertising, landscape, Container Corporation of America, Edgar Allan Poe, T. S. Eliot, Man Ray, Herbert Matter, Herbert Bayer, A. M. Cassandre, Jean Carlu

Shocked and Appealed


Well, this is certainly pugnacious—but what propaganda isn’t, really? It takes no learned scholar to discern that this poster means business. Euphemism wasn’t really of interest to the United States in December 1941, when its resistance to entering World War II was abruptly terminated by the infamous events in Pearl Harbor. The nation was catapulted into the global turmoil that had already blurred national boundaries and sent refugees seeking shelter in other countries all over the world.
World War II, propaganda, Cubism, Jean Carlu, posters, graphic design, offset lithography