George Washington

All The World's A Fair


When F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby in 1925, the Valley of Ashes he described as “fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens,” was a very real place. This wasteland between Brooklyn and Queens was known as the Corona Dump, where the Brooklyn Ash Removal Company disposed of the vast quantities of coal burned in New York furnaces. It may be hard to imagine, but the bright and beautiful scene gracing the cover of this issue of the New Yorker from 1939 is the very same place!  
Ilonka Karasz, New Yorker, magazine, illustration, New York, world's fair, party, Robert Moses, F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Washington

Portraiture on Wallpaper with George Washington


This wallpaper panel contains a block-printed portrait of George Washington rendered about half-life size. It is unusual to have portraits featured on wallpaper but is seen more often on panels as opposed to repeating designs. The portrait is printed in a monochrome colorway of tans and brown imitating statuary, on a combed ground simulating oak wood grain. Washington is shown dressed in military attire standing on a plinth with a cannon and shot at his feet.
wallpaper, George Washington, American Revolution, War of 1812, statuary, monochrome

Memorial to Washington


This is one of the earliest American wallpapers in the Cooper-Hewitt collection. This is a memorial to George Washington and was produced within a year of his death. The design shows an obelisk with the portrait of Washington, an angel above, and trophies of war at the base. Flowering vines form an arch over the obelisk. Designs in this format are referred to as pillar and arch papers, which were designed in England later in the 19th century. This paper is a rather loose interpretation of this style.
George Washington, obelisk, pillar, arch, trophy

Views of the American War of Independence


Views of the American War of Independence was first printed by Zuber in 1852. This paper illustrates the American Revolution in four scenes using the background imagery from an earlier scenic wallpaper called Views of North America first printed by Zuber in 1834. All of the scenes for North America were modifications of original drawings by naturalist painter J. Milbert in 1828, whose drawings illustrate the new practice of showing realistic renderings of landscapes rather than one composed in a studio.
wallpaper, scenic, panorama, papier peint, George Washington, American Revolution

The George Washington Monuments


By the time of his death in 1799, George Washington had become one of America’s first national heroes. This drawing is an example of one way the American public coped with the first President’s death: through mourning pictures.
George Washington, monuments, mourning pictures, English decorative arts, Potomac River, Mount Vernon, President, America, tombs, drawing, Architecture

Sacred to Washington


Sacred to Washington is one of the earliest American wallpapers in the collection. This is a woodblock print on joined sheets of handmade paper. While it has faded to a uniform shade of gray, the design was originally printed in grisaille, or shades of gray, on a blue ground, as can be seen in abraded areas at the bottom of the design.
wallpaper, memorial, trophies, Liberty, Justice, eagle, George Washington