england

A carriage fit for an Earl


Roger Palmer, the first Earl of Castlemaine, was an English writer, diplomat and courtier who sat in the House of Commons. Palmer was a devout Roman Catholic and a staunch supporter of the Stuart Monarchy. Palmer’s loyalty was so committed that he even  acquiesced to the appointment of his wife, Barbara Villiers as Charles II’s favored mistress. It is in honor of his wife’s services in the King’s bedchamber that Palmer received his title as Earl of Castlemaine, and not for his service in the King’s court.
Roger Palmer, Earl of Castlemaine, england, diplomacy, travel, transportation, treason, carriage, ostentation, print, engraving, baroque

A contemporary wallcovering in the Arts and Crafts tradition


The Oakleaf pattern caught my eye in that it is a contemporary rendering done in a very traditional manner. Its simplicity and monochromatic colorway all speak to the modern, while the vining, intertwining nature, and density of design all speak of master designers from long ago. I like seeing ideas of the past reflected in current designs. Even the handmade nature of the linoleum block-printing hark back to the Arts and Crafts period happening in the late-19th to early-20th centuries.
Marthe Armitage, contemporary, wallcovering, William Morris, england, Arts and Crafts

The Wild Man from Wells Cathedral


Framed by swirling green leaves, the face of a man with protruding brows and a scraggly beard graces this misericord. Sometimes called a ‘mercy seat,’ the misericord was the small ledge that protruded from the undersides of folding seats in a choir stall in a medieval church or cathedral. Medieval liturgical services were conducted eight times a day, and the clergy who attended and performed the services had to stand during the entire ritual. Developed in the 13th century, the misericord allowed the clergy to rest while appearing to stand during services.
Misericord, england, 14th century, oak, carving, seat, Church, Wells Cathedral, Wild Man

Sitting on Sculpture


Many people say “Chippendale” when they see a chair with a carved and pierced back.  While it is true that Thomas Chippendale designed such chairs and his workshop produced similar models, the reason such chairs bear his name is because of the book of designs he published, The Gentleman and Cabinetmaker’s Director the first edition of which was in 1754.
chair, Chippendale, carving, england, Scotland, Ireland, Affleck, Philadelphia, damask, mahogany, red walnut, Director

New Day


Often called "England’s Eamses," Robin and Lucienne Day were a designing couple utterly committed to modernism. The unexpectedness and vitality of their postwar interior furnishings, particularly Lucienne’s pattern designs for textiles, carpets, wallcoverings, and dishware, shaped the look of modern England in the 1950s.
Robin Day, Lucienne Day, Festival of Britain, Calyx, Paul Klee, textiles, textile design, england, 20th century, interiors

Tender Mourning in Style


This touching object, made of hair cut into patterns, is a tribute to a lost sister. It expresses the neoclassical style of its day with the Greek-style tomb, but also references the sister’s Christianity by the presence of a cross that has been created from bands of hair. The tree is a weeping willow, an appropriately obvious reference typical of this style of picture.
hair designs, mourning, sentimental design, Thomas Hope, england

Red-Hot!


Red! Here I Am! Red-hot! In 2009, I first noticed this electric space heater prototype, designed in 1973 by Bill Moggridge, from across an exhibition gallery. The form immediately grabbed my attention with its startling—yet pleasing—tone of vibrant red. A departure from the black- or beige-box modernism of many industrial design objects of the period, this heater combines rational design with emotional appeal in a highly utilitarian object.
Heater, Bill Moggridge, Hoover Ltd., england, 1970s, Industrial Design, modernism

The Prince Regent's Style: Decorative Arts in England 1800-1830.


drawings, Frederick Crace, england, 19th century, decorative arts

4 Questions 4: Anab Jain


Anab Jain, founding partner of Superflux, discusses the influence of fantastical beliefs on her work, the structure of her business, and the designer's shifting role in 21st century "architectures of collaboration."
anab jain, superflux, India, UK, england, contemporary design, consultancy, Business, 4q4, 4 Questions 4, digital studio, lab, practice, philosophy

The Royal Pavilion at Brighton


This exhibition honors the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II with a celebration of the architecture and design of the Royal Pavilion at Brighton, originally commissioned by George IV in the 18th century and completed in the 19th century. The furnishings and designs on display include items  from the Cooper-Hewitt's permanent collection, the Royal Pavilion's collection, and nine items especially chosen by the Queen. Works by architect John Nash, and designers Frederick Crace and Augustus Charles Pugin, are featured.
england, Architecture, furnishings, George IV, traveling exhibitions

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