enamel

A Jeweled Temptation


In the 1590s, life as a Huguenot in France was tenuous.  Daniel Mignot, a trained goldsmith, must have felt this acutely, for he left his native France and re-established himself in the city of Augsburg, in present day Germany.  While Augsburg offered him the religious freedom to live openly as a Protestant, the city’s laws prevented Mignot, as a foreigner, from practicing his craft.  Mignot turned to printmaking as a way of showcasing and disseminating his innovative designs for jewelry.  It also proved to be a lucrative form of generating income. 
Daniel Mignot, Jan Theodor de Bry, jewelry design, enamel, temptation, virtue, engraving, blackwork, rings

One Woman’s Fancy is another’s Necessaire.


This charming little object-an étui or case, is also called a necessaire.
étui, necessaire, scissors, rococo, Diana, accessory, enamel

A Look at Safavid Glass


Looking at this colored glass ewer that was produced in Iran sometime in the seventeenth to early eighteenth century, during the late Safavid dynasty,  I cannot help but be reminded of a colored glass wine bottle.  Coincidentally, this vessel most likely would have been used for wine as well, since much of the glass production in Safavid Iran was linked to the wine industry in Shiraz.  The Shirazi wine industry is credited with spurring glass production in Iran b
ewer, Glass, enamel, gilding, Safavid, Iran, Persia, wine

Seductive Holders for Seductive Sweets


This small object has no real comparable in current life, even though we still like sweets.  While small lovely pillboxes might count, those have their own counterparts in the eighteenth century.  We do not normally carry around little boxes of candies in luxurious containers today, even if we are thrilled with special chocolates brought to us at home.  The bonbonnière belongs to a type of object often called an “object of vertu” in which the word vertu means virtuosity.
bonbonniere, sweets, candy, object of vertu, gold, enamel, agate, container

An Early Eva Zeisel Design


Designer Eva Zeisel, born on this date in 1906, passed away at the age of 105 last December. A major figure in 20th-century industrial design, she is perhaps best known for her contributions to mid-20th century American modernist ceramics. Her career, however, spanned more than 80 years, and we are fortunate to have some of her early works, including this tea set known variously as the Leningrad or Intourist tea service (Intourist was the Soviet Union’s official state travel bureau).
Eva Zeisel, Varvara Petrovna Freze, Lomonosov Porcelain Factory, ceramics, Porcelain, enamel, gilding, Soviet Union, Leningrad, Tea set, Pratt Institute, Hungary

Enamel: An Historic Survey to the Present Day


enamel, Limoges, decorative objects, miniatures, jewelry