decor

Wallpaper Cubed


I have always found these cubist wallpapers charming and attractive in their simple design format. These were produced in a wide array of styles but all contained some arrangement of seemingly random cube patterns printed in pastel colors. Virtually all of these designs were printed on an ungrounded paper. The application of a ground color became more important with the introduction of wood pulp paper in the 1850s. As you are probably aware, papers containing wood pulp tend to oxidize and start turning brown shortly after production.
wallpaper, cubist, pastel, kitchen, decor, interior design

Did Hofman have a change of heart?


Quirky and interesting, this elevation caught my eye as an object of the day to write about. I was especially drawn to the work, “Elevation Design for a Sitting Room, with Sofa, Two Chairs and Table”, because recently, the Cooper-Hewitt had a wonderful exhibit, House Proud, which was a look into 19th century rooms through watercolors. I wondered if there was any link to these room studies. But, this elevation, also a watercolor, was done later, in 1919.
Hofman, hexagon, Rondo, Cubism, Minimalist, decor

Fresco Papers


Scenic wallpapers were the epitome of block-printed wallpapers, requiring thousands of wood blocks to print a non-repeating scene that could wrap a room in a continuous landscape view. Scenic wallpapers were introduced around 1804 and remained popular as new scenes were added until the 1860s. Around the 1840s, a new style emerged that altered the scenic landscape format through the introduction of decors, also known as fresco papers.
Alpine, cow, wallcovering, fresco, decor, landscapes