Chantilly

Lace in Fashion: Chantilly


In the mid-nineteenth century, a style of bobbin lace commonly known as Chantilly achieved a great popularity that endured in varying degrees until the end of the century.  The town of Chantilly produced lace for the French court in the eighteenth century, but ceased operations during the French Revolution. In the early nineteenth century, lace making slowly revived, but much of the production was made for export to the Spanish market.
Chantilly, lace, head covering

Vive la France! Vive Chantilly! Vive Elegance!


Kakiemon, the  famed Japanese originator of the style that bears this name,  was the first to bring enamel to the fabric of porcelain in 17th-century Japan. Kakiemon decoration was of very high quality, known for its delicate and asymmetric—yet well balanced—designs.
Kakiemon, Porcelain, France, Louis XV, Chantilly, 18th century