bracelet

Art in Metal: The Modernist Jewelry of Greenwich Village’s Art Smith


Joel and Ethan Cohen’s movie that is in theaters now, Inside Llewyn Davis, sets much of its story around the Greenwich Village folk scene of 1961. From 1946-1979, over on 140 West Fourth Street, the African-American jewelry designer, Art Smith (American, born in Cuba, 1917-1982), fashioned modernist pieces from simple metals that achieved new expressions in shape and form.
bracelet, earrings, Art Smith, Alexander Calder, Jean Arp, Duke Ellington, Greewich Village, Margot Gayle, Eleanor Roosevelt

Horsehair jewelry


The custom of keeping a locket of hair as a token of love, or as a relic of a holy figure, has existed for centuries. The idea of using hair for the structural part of jewelry became fashionable in the eighteenth century. By the 1830s, especially in England and the United States, all sorts of pendants, brooches, earrings, necklaces, and bracelets were made using human as well as horsehair. Commercial catalogues of the 1850s to 1870s mass-marketed these delicate designs. It is inspiring how a banal material can be reinvented into something precious.
jewelry, horsehair, necklace, bracelet

The Braille Alphabet Bracelet Wins the 2010 People’s Design Award


The Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum presented its fifth People’s Design Award to the Braille Alphabet Bracelet Thursday, Oct. 14, at its 11th annual National Design Awards gala in New York. 
Braille, alphabet, bracelet, Peoples design award, 2010, winner, Leslie Ligon, First Sight Braille Jewelry, functional, literacy, Blind, blindness, vision, impaired, independence, National Braille Press, BrailleInk, past, winners, Katrina Cottage, Marianne Cusato, Toms Shoes, Zon Hearing Aid, Trek Lime Bicycle