Rebekah Pollock

Always be Mama


“May there always be sunshine, May there always be sky, May there always be Mama, May there always be me.”
Porcelain, figure, Dulevo factory, propaganda, Soviet Union, Yakut

A Masterful Balance


This etching, a screen design by great artist François Boucher, is iconic for its inclusion of the French word rocaille. In the eighteenth century, rocaille referred to the irregular rockwork that was used to embellish picturesque grottos and garden fountains but the word has since come to be synonymous with the rococo as a style. The design exemplifies the fanciful profusion of flora and fauna characteristic of the period. Sinuous plant forms asymmetrically frame a fountain encrusted with shells. Below, two monkeys squabble beside a flowing pool of water.
François Boucher, Claude-Augustin Duflos, rocaille, engraving, print, screens, rococo, gardens, fountains, Rococo: The Continuing Curve

Ballet Brigands


Two dangerous looking brigands stand at attention, ready to spring into action; their brightly colored cloaks flap in the wind. The energetic tension of these figures, their exotic appeal and wildly patterned textiles are all signature traits of work by the great costume and stage set designer Léon Bakst. The Jewish Russian artist began designing for the legendary Ballets Russes in 1909, at the age of 43. The dance company amazed audiences with its radical choreography, inventive music and extraordinary sets and costumes.
Léon Nikolajewitsch Bakst, Costume design, Ballet Russes, textile design

Diplomatic Swans


This charger belonged to the Meissen Swan Service, one of the largest and most magnificent porcelain dinner services ever created. Produced at the Dresden manufactory between the years of 1737 and 1743, the service comprised of over 2,000 unique pieces; its splendor is illustrative of both the artistic genius of the factory’s master modeler, Johann Joachim Kändler, as well as the ambitions of its director, Heinrich Count von Brühl, for whom the service was commissioned.
Swan, Porcelain, Bruhl, Meissen, rococo, diplomacy

Miniature Fantasy


Juste-Aurèle Meissonnier (1695 –1750) is recognized as a creative genius behind the French Rococo style. He first published his influential Livre d'Ornements (Book of Ornaments) in 1734 and then again in 1748. These small booklets were circulated among countless craftsmen and artisans who applied Meissonier’s designs to decorative artwork such as ceramics, metalwork, marquetry, and textiles. 
Juste-Aurèle Meissonnier, ornament, lighting, engraving, rococo