Joanna Burgess

Birdcage In The Form Of A Church


Playwright Jacques Deval once wrote, “God loved the birds and made trees. Man loved the birds and made cages.” I am much more content watching birds soaring and swooping. Still I can’t help but admire this finely designed piece of art. When I first saw this birdcage in the form of a church the word that came to mind was “amazing.” 
Birdcage, Church, Gothic style, Flushing, New York

A Parure To Remember


For years people have bought souvenirs as reminders of their journeys. They are an echo of the places visited and of the sights seen. Collecting souvenirs was an important part of the overall travel experience for the 19th-century tourist. To be seen as a person of the world was a status symbol, and was important to members of “high society.” By the early 19th-century, Italy had become a popular destination for well-to-do Europeans and Americans.
Parure, micro-mosaic, Glass, jewelry, Italy, grand tour, travel, antiquities

A Portable Equatorial Sundial


Here is an object that any traveler, especially myself, would be happy to pop in their bag. That will not come to pass, but I can still ponder how I would impress fellow adventurers with this beautiful gilt brass, steel and glass wonder. This portable equatorial sundial, of 1748, is a finely crafted instrument by Jacob Emanuel Laminit. Laminit lived and worked in Augsburg, Germany arguably one of the premiere centers of scientific gadgetry in its day. It was here that some of the world’s most beautiful sundials were constructed.
Sundial, Jacob Emanuel Laminit, Augsburg, geography, travel, animals, scientific instruments

The Glamour of the Gilded Age


The end of the American Civil War saw the rise of the Gilded Age. A time of opulence for some and hardship for many, this era reached its heyday towards the end of the 1890s. From the salons and opera houses of Paris to the halls of the fine houses that lined Fifth Avenue, women’s fashions took a turn toward the modern. Where old and new money, adorned in fine silks and exquisitely beaded attire rubbed shoulders over fine wine and respectable conversation, women’s fashion blossomed.
Gilded Age, fan, putti

Nothing's Flocking


Christina Malman was born in Southhampton, England in 1912. When she was two year’s old she moved to New York City, where she lived and worked for the rest of her life. Christina began her career as a cover artist for the “New Yorker” magazine in the mid 1930’s. Over the course of twenty years, she designed numerous covers, 34 of which were actually published by the New Yorker.  She also drew more than 500 "spot" illustrations, many of which were used in the “Goings on About Town” section of the magazine.
New Yorker, magazine cover, Audobon, bird watching, satire