Elaine Gerstein

A Vase Designed by a Distinguished, But Forgotten Man


Hector Guimard (French, 1867-1942), architect, designer and craftsman, was best known for his iconic Paris Metro entrances (If visiting Paris, you may want to note this contribution).  Guimard heralded the Art Nouveau style to France at a time when historic references in the arts were losing favor. Art Nouveau brought a new vit
Hector Guimard, Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory, Porcelain, glaze, Art Nouveau

Museum Skyphos, a Mystery


The Museum’s skyphos, a small wine cup, is from 5th century BC Apulia in Southern Italy, a Greek region at the time.
Skyphos, Apulia, Italy, wine cup, red-figure, terracotta

Did Hofman have a change of heart?


Quirky and interesting, this elevation caught my eye as an object of the day to write about. I was especially drawn to the work, “Elevation Design for a Sitting Room, with Sofa, Two Chairs and Table”, because recently, the Cooper-Hewitt had a wonderful exhibit, House Proud, which was a look into 19th century rooms through watercolors. I wondered if there was any link to these room studies. But, this elevation, also a watercolor, was done later, in 1919.
Hofman, hexagon, Rondo, Cubism, Minimalist, decor

Vive la France! Vive Chantilly! Vive Elegance!


Kakiemon, the  famed Japanese originator of the style that bears this name,  was the first to bring enamel to the fabric of porcelain in 17th-century Japan. Kakiemon decoration was of very high quality, known for its delicate and asymmetric—yet well balanced—designs.
Kakiemon, Porcelain, France, Louis XV, Chantilly, 18th century