Object of the Day

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pfaffli
The Rise of Risography
Risography was invented in the 1980s in Japan as a cheaper alternative to xerography for small businesses. The machine is similar in appearance to a photocopier, but as a form of stencil duplication, it is akin as a printing method to screenprint. An image, designed to print one color at a time, is cut into...
shiro shita saori
Let’s Get Digital
The rise of digital printing has transformed the ability of graphic designers to produce and publish their work. Inkjet printing is a technique that propels tiny droplets of ink onto the paper. Laser printing— the updated method of photocopying—uses a laser beam to train back and forth across an electron-charged drum to define the image....
warhol
Pushed Through A Screen
A screenprint is produced using a gauzy screen that has been stretched across a rectangular wooden frame. Ink is spread across the top portion of the screen by the printer, who then pulls the ink towards them with a rubber blade commonly known as a squeegee. The pressure forces the ink through the screen and...
cabellon
Quality and Quantity
Around the turn of the twentieth century, the new process of offset lithography emerged within the commercial printing industry. “Offset” refers to the process of transferring ink from a flexible matrix to a rubber cylinder, which then transfers the image to the paper. Offset printing replaced heavy stones with light, flexible plates and automated the...
klucis
Revolution in a Grid of Dots
Although photography was invented in 1839, its impact on poster design remained relatively minor until the late nineteenth century, as traditional lithography and letterpress are incapable of reproducing shades of gray. A sea change in poster design arrived with the advent of the halftone process, which emerged fully in the 1880s. Halftone mimics the appearance...
Wijdeveld
For the Love of Letterpress
Letterpress, introduced in the fifteenth century, employs individual elements of wood or lead cut into letterforms, rules, and ornaments and pieced together to form a composition. Held together in a rectangular frame known as a chase, the elements that receive the ink are raised above the rest of the surface. When ink is applied, it...
Thikker
Oil and Water Do Not Mix
Posters are all around us.  We see them on the street, in the subway, tacked to bulletin boards in schools and coffee shops, and hanging on the walls of theaters and concert venues. And we see them online, collected or disseminated on social media.  But how are posters made?  For the next few days, that’s the...
1974-23-6
Lydia’s New York
Batik, an ancient craft often associated with Indonesia, became popular in United States in the 1910s and 20s, with artists such as Arthur Crisp, Pieter Mijer, and Lydia Bush-Brown attracting national attention. These artists worked in the traditional manner, painting paraffin and beeswax on their cloth to create a resist, but expanded the traditional design...
Three vertically rectangular panels of marbleized glass, each panel framed with narrow copper edging oxidized to green and orange-red tones with two small ball feet at each end. The panels are hinged together by means of wire at juncture of feet and screen. Cut out copper overlay. Glass marbleized in tones of lavender, blue and green overlaid with cut out copper in “Grapevine” pattern.
Grapevine Screen
This glass screen was designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany,  an American artist and designer most well known for his work in stained glass. Tiffany is well known for originating a type of marbleized iridescent art glass, known as Favrile glass. Favrile was an adaptation of the Old English word febrile, meaning “hand wrought.” Tiffany’s iridescent surfaces...